Transmission noise

transmissions

#1

I have 1992 Honda Accord, LX. Automatic. 108K miles. There is a “growling” sound that comes from the transmission once the car reaches 40 miles per hour. This sound increases and decreases with the speed of the car. The car shifts fine. Does not buck. The transmission fluid most likely needs to be changed considering the mileage, and I’m not aware if it was ever changed considering I am not the original owner. I have been told a few things are possible causes. Changing the fluid may help was one. (Questionable) There is a sensor that can cause this. And lastly, it needs to be rebuilt. Has anyone experienced this? And what suggestions do you have? Thank you.


#2

Great. Are you also aware that the transmission fluid level needs to be checked? Low fluid could cause your problem.


#3

We won’t lecture you on the scheduled maintenance, but we don’t read anything in your post about a plan to change the fluid.

108K miles and the fluid has lost it’s ability to function properly. It’s a cheap way to evaluate weather there is anything that can be done.

Have you even checked the fluid level like the manual and the dip stick suggest???

I’d do an fluid exchange so most of the fluid is replaced. There are ways to do this yourself on u-tube. $50 dollars is still less than what yopu would have paid a mechanic to examine this vehicle before purchase.

Yosemite


#4

@Yosemite Thank you for the input. I did mention changing the fluid. I said I found it questionable that it would solve the problem. (I’m not a Honda guy) I do plan to change the fluid, as I agree it is far cheaper than paying someone to look at it. I didn’t bother to have the car looked at when I got it considering it was free from a family member who rarely drove the car. Let alone over 40 mph. So they wouldn’t have noticed the noise. I just figured that some details were not needed in order to get an “idea” of what I was dealing with. I will definitely check out the YouTube videos. Thanks again.


#5

@missileman The fluid level is good. That was checked first off.


#6

^
Just make sure that ONLY genuine Honda trans fluid of the correct specification for the '92 model is used.

If anyone tells you that adding a bottle of some kind of additive to Dexron or other fluids is okay, please ignore them. Unless you use genuine Honda trans fluid, you will definitely wind up with a trans overhaul.


#7

Thank you for that @VDCdriver !


#8

IIRC, Hondas also require a unique power steering fluid. This may be genuine Honda trans fluid, or it may be something different, but I seem to recall from when I owned a '92 Accord that you couldn’t use “generic” power steering fluid in a Honda. Be sure to consult the Owner’s Manual regarding both the trans fluid specification and the PS fluid specification.

My '92 Accord was a very good car, and if yours was well taken care of, it should continue to perform decently. The only real problems with these cars was a pronounced tendency to rust in the area around the rear wheel wells, and–of course–owners who didn’t bother to change the timing belt wound up with destroyed valves and pistons.

I would strongly recommend that you change the timing belt unless you have documented evidence that it was done during the last 6 years or so.


#9

Funny you mention that rust @VDCdriver ! Lol. It does have that rust. Not too major though since it was stored in a garage and hardly driven. Thanks for the info on the fluids. VERY good to know! I do believe the timing belt was changed about 3 - 4 years ago. But I will have to check again to be sure.


#10

^
Just remember that the timing belt change interval is a mileage or elapsed time schedule, with a “whichever comes first” proviso. So, on a low odometer mileage car like this, you need to follow the elapsed time recommendation, which–I think–is every 5 years or so for this model.


#11

Excellent @VDCdriver . The car is in very good shape. The few times it has been in a mechanics hands, they have remarked that it was hardly broken in. (So I was told) So I guess if I need to put a few dollars into it, I can’t be too bad off. :smile:


#12

Well there are bearings, gears, clutches, shafts, etc. inside the transmission that can wear and cause noise. Bad news is the transmission has to come apart to repair it which means might as well overhaul it at the same time.


#13
This sound increases and decreases with the speed of the car.

Does it change when you take your foot off the gas? If not, it could be a front wheel bearing.


#14

I already eliminated the wheel bearings. Both are new @insightful . It was placed on a lift and the noise comes directly from the transmission. :neutral:


#15

Deleted. I wrote before reading. My bad.


#16

@“the same mountainbike” The noise was achieved while the car was in the air also. (Unfortunately)


#17

Yeah, I just didn’t see it until after I wrote my post. I claim old age.


#18

No worries @“the same mountainbike” I feel your pain. Lol


#19

My dads car is making a similar noise only it starts almost right when you start moving. I replaced the driver side wheel bearing and CV shaft( they were both bad). I thought this would fix the problem but it didn’t. I’m starting to lean towards it being the transmission now. I’ll check the fluid level (if I can, his car is an 05 Chevy Malibu classic so idk if it is survivable or not)


#20

You just tagged onto a year old thread that is about a different vehicle . Please start your own thread so the replies will be for your problem.