T-boned, is it safe to drive my car?


#1

I was t-boned at an intersection, (I had a green light) My car was hit by the rear door and part of my wheel rim was broken off.
The tire is keeping the air.
We are also going to have a guy from the other driver’s insurance coming to check out my car, I want to be sure my car is safe, he might want to get repairs done as cheaply as possible.
Any insights and tips would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: It’s a Chevy Malibu 2013
(I’m not driving it btw)


#2

The visible damage may not tell the whole story. The impact to the rear suspension may have bent / broken parts you can not see…I would NOT drive the car until it has been inspected for hidden damage and that broken wheel replaced…What is the year, make and model of your vehicle?


#3

Sorry, I should have added that info, It’s a Chevy Malibu 2013.
It’s the hidden damage I am worried about. Also, that the other driver’s insurance will make light of the damage as it doesn’t look that bad. But it was a pretty hard blow, and my car got lifted up and thrown to the side.


#4

Having been hit hard enough to break the rim means ( as caddy says ) there’s more damge you can’t see.
I think you’ll find you car does not drive in a straight line without a steering adjustment on your part.
The components the hold that rim may be bent from the impact and need replaced ( you don’t straighten control arms or knuckles. )
An alignment shop will be able to diagnose the underlying needs.
Do NOT settle for a mere re-alignment . replace the rim and any bent suspension.
The rim is holding air now but consider just how much flex that tire goes through every mile. It won’t last long.
Till then, drive slow and easy.


#5

@Aafke
"Also, that the other driver’s insurance will make light of the damage as it doesn’t look that bad."

It’s your car. You have a right to have the car repaired at a shop of your choice and to have it repaired properly. I’m not sure if the insurance company can specify a used wheel or not (accepted practice when car is a certain age), but if they do then you have the right to accept one that’s as good or better than the one you had or reject one that’s not.

Check with the state Department Of Motor Vehicles or Secretary Of State office. Sometimes they have brochures or online brochures covering this for your state.

You must not be in a “No Fault” state, eh?

CSA


#6

Thanks everybody, I do feel better reading your comments.
I’m in Texas btw.
Where a lot of people don’t stop for red lights…


#7

Do Realize That If You Cause Additional Damage By Operating The Vehicle, That It Will No Doubt, Not Be Covered By Insurance.
CSA


#8

You need to get the car to the body shop you’ll be using so that you can get their diagnosis and estimate. Your insurance company should help you to get those items covered if there are any problems.

However, I wouldn’t risk anything more than a short drive at 30 MPH or less on that wheel. The tire could blow out at any time.


#9

No, there will likely be considerable hidden damage that affects tracking and the rear suspension in general.


#10

I am definitely not driving the car. Thanks for all the advice.


#11

Agree with the others but I would not deal with the other insurance company. Just deal with your own agent and let them handle the other company. If you have collision, your insurance will cover the damage and they will go after the other company through subrogation and then you’ll get your deductible back. Let one shark deal with the other sharks and don’t go into the water yourself.


#12

Thanks.


#13

You have auto insurance. They will take care f this for you. That is why you pay them so much. It’s not just to pay when you are at fault, they represent you when someone else is at fault. Your insurer may send you to one of their partner shops and submit the bill to the other guy’s insurer. Do it ASAP and have all the info on the accident available for them so that you don’t have to call twice.


#14

You’ve gotten good advice here.
I want to compliment you fro being smart enough not to drive this vehicle. Whether or not there’s other damage, and that should be assessed by a competent shop, that wheel is definitely not safe to drive on. The bead of the tire is not properly secured with that piece missing, the edge of the broken area could easily cut the sidewall while your driving, AND the alloy could easily have sustained fractures that cannot be seen without radiographic or dye-penetrant inspection

Be aware too that after the car has been properly evaluated and repaired, if you then discover an additional problem you can still file an amendment to the claim… deal with your own insurance agent, as everyone has suggested.


#15

Thanks ya’all for all the excellent advice.

jtsanders, We have been at this for a few weeks now, police report, insurances, it all seems to take forever. I did make sure to take photos right after. We have everything together now, but we’re still being sent from this place to the other. Never mind, we’ll get through it.

The same Mountainbike, Thanks, interesting information. I will heed it.


#16

Then there is the possibility that if you turn it in to your insurance company, they may raise your rates even if they subrogate against the other carrier. If they never find out about it, they won’t have that opportunity.

You can tell either company where YOU WILL have it fixed. They can’t demand where you take it.

No fault only applies to the first set dollar amount of YOUR MEDICAL expenses. It’s designed to keep you from having to sue “the other guy” to collect small change. It does not take care of any damage to your car. IF you were injured, you have no choice but to tell your insurer for your no fault coverage to kick in.

As a quick check to see if there is suspension damage, stick three or four fingers between the front of the tire on the damaged side and do the same on the undamaged side. If the same number of fingers fit, the damage to the suspension likely to be light. My guess is it’s bent. If you were pushed into a curb, check BOTH ends of the car.


#17
Then there is the possibility that if you turn it in to your insurance company, they may raise your rates even if they subrogate against the other carrier.

I guess that depends on what state you live in. Many states like NH, MA and NY have laws preventing that.

You can tell either company where YOU WILL have it fixed. They can't demand where you take it.

And you don’t even have to have it fixed. You can just pocket the money. Or just get enough fixed to get it running and pocket the rest.


#18

Quoting @MikeInNH

“I guess that depends on what state you live in. Many states like NH, MA and NY have laws preventing that.”

Yes, and I understand that all three of those states pay some of the highest insurance rates in the country. With rules like that, rate payers are subsidizing those who have had serious accidents and not suffered an increase.

"And you don't even have to have it fixed. You can just pocket the money. Or just get enough fixed to get it running and pocket the rest."

True, but she at least has to get a new (spelled ‘good used’) wheel and have the rear suspension and alignment checked. Might want to replace that tire too, just in case it has invisible damage.

If she has the car financed, the lending institution is (or is supposed to be) listed as a loss payee on the policy. Their name should be on the check to prevent the OP from simply pocketing the money and not fixing the car. You might be surprised how many repossessed cars have significant damage. That’s often why.


#19
Yes, and I understand that all three of those states pay some of the highest insurance rates in the country

And you’d be wrong. MA is in the top 30…but NH and NY are in the bottom 10. Take NY city out of the mix…and NY would probably the lowest.


#20

WOW @MikeInNH! That’s interesting, and goes against everything I’ve ever been misinformed about concerning insurance rates. Thanks for the link.