Snake in car


#1

I may have a 5 - 6 ft 2" diameter snake hiding in my engine compartment or undercarriage. It was underneath my car and we never saw it come out. I drove 40 miles, parked the car in the driveway, called Honda, its a 2008 FIT. Dealer said it could get in through the a/c vents. How can I be sure its not there and how long do I keep it out in the TX sun? I don’t like snakes and am nervous as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs. HELP.


#2

I would contact a local zoo or other related agencies in your area. Explain your concerns and they will either send someone or provide advise.


#3

AHHHHHHHHHHH! I get the shivers just THINKIN’ about it!

You’re braver than me. I wouldn’t have gotten back in the vehicle at all if I had seen one crawl in or wasn’t sure about it being there.


#4

Snakes can not tolerate much heat…Park the car in the sun and observe. The snake will be wanting out. Rattlesnakes are easy to identify. If it’s not a Rattler, then it’s harmless.


#5

I am with Roadrunner on this. I don’t care if they rattle, rock or tango. I am not getting close to that car. Call animal control. The local ER could also tell you what other options you have.


#6

I really doubt that a snake could get into a new vehicle through the duct work…You also have no idea if the snake even made the trip with you…more than likely if it did when it gets hungry it will go somewhere else… also reptiles love heat…you will see them out on rocks to warm up…


#7

“If it’s not a Rattler, then it’s harmless.”

Texas has every main venomous species in the USA: copperheads, water moccasins, coral snakes, and rattlesnakes. I’m not sure where they all live, but marytherese could have one or all of them in her area. I would think that near the Gulf of Mexico you would find all of them; West Texas may just have the rattlesnakes.

marytherrese, contact your local animal control folks or the University of Texas agricultural extension office. They can point you to the right folks if they aren’t the ones. The snake may just curl up there to keep warm, but certainly goes hunting. Once it leaves, it probably won’t be back. But the animal control folks can help you. They will catch it and move it. While I’m not partial to snakes, either, I recognize that they are very valuable in keeping the rodent population in check.


#8

You probably ditched it in your 40 mile drive.


#9

How did they deal with this issue in that movie of a couple of years ago, Snakes on a Plane?
That film might be a good resource if you can rent it.


#10

A 5-6 foot snake can get through a very small hole but the odds of a snake managing to work its way into your car are near non-existent.
Since rattlers are the predominantly venomous ones in TX you might also relax a bit in knowing that rattlers are not climbers and also why you won’t see them even in small trees or shrubs. Cottonmouths are a different story and they do climb but they generally hang around bodies of water.

A few weeks ago my wife was working in the yard and noticed a 5 foot snake by our porch. Her screams got my attention and I got there just in time to see the snake heading for a 1.5" hole in the concrete foundation. No amount of tail pulling would drag it out and eventually it got away to parts unknown.

Around the same time my daughter (lives in another town) was supposed to bring her Mustang by for some general maintenance. When she got out of bed she noticed a strange ring in the bathroom floor that was not there previously. In a panic, she called and it appears this ring was a dead snake. Apparently this snake had tried to devour itself and died during the process. It had managed to swallow about 1/3 of itself before expiring. I’ve got a pic of this oddity, which is a new one on me.


#11

You just teased everyone with news of a pic of a snake eating itself and didn’t post it?


#12

If you really think that the snake is still in your car, go park the car on any college or university campus. The snake will soon depart the car and find company with the other snakes on the faculty and in the administration.


#13

I tried to post it with no luck. The pic won’t appear. Will try it again later this evening.


#14

“If you really think that the snake is still in your car, go park the car on any college or university campus. The snake will soon depart the car and find company with the other snakes on the faculty and in the administration.”

MEOWWWW!!


#15

"…you might also relax a bit in knowing that rattlers are not climbers and also why you won’t see them even in small trees or shrubs.?

My BIL used to cruise timber in South Carolina for a major pulp company. He was walking down the trail one day, glanced to his right, and saw a rather large rattlesnake in the crook of a tree staring him in the face - no more than a foot away. He immediately turned around, walked back to his truck, and spent the rest of the afternoon shaking in his seat.

It’s a good thing it wasn’t a water moccasin; they’re mean and will actively attack you. Rattlesnakes are only dangerous if you provoke them.


#16
  • Rikky Tikky Tavi.

#17

Still can’t get that pic to post so I’ll try it again tomorrow. I have no idea why.
The pic was taken with a cell phone and mailed back to my email address.


#18

I agree with jtsanders, please don’t kill it. I whole-heartedly agree to call professionals, Animal Control…etc.

 So you've got a "tiger in your tank" and a snake on the seat. (Sorry that was lame, someone already stole the "Snakes on a plane" bit.)

 PLEASE let us know how things turned out!! If we dont' hear from you, well...   

I guess somewhere in TX there’s a 5’ by 2" diameter snake who is now driving a 2008 FIT.


#19

“I guess somewhere in TX there’s a 5’ by 2” diameter snake who is now driving a 2008 FIT.

If this snake finds the seats in the Honda as reported by some of the other posts, the snake may give up the Honda for another make.


#20

Try this. Just starting to enter rigor mortis.

Daughter walked into the bathroom and found this on the floor. No idea how it got in the house but it had just recently died. - See this image on Photobucket.