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Equinox ck eng light

Check eng light keeps coming on and stays on. Dealer says the air filter hose is the cause. Light was off for two hours after having in for correction but came right back on again before I got home. I’ve lifted the hood and the hose seems to be tightly in place. Can’t keep going back to dealer as I’ve been there 3 times for this. They replaced a sensor 2nd time but problem continued into 3rd visit. Now I’m at a loss as to what to do. Like the car but don’t feel safe driving any distance while the check engine light remains on.

What error code did the dealer see? Or you could get the error codes read at a local auto parts store for free. It should be in the form P1234. Post the codes the counter guy reads. Ignore what he says they are, just post the codes and we will try and help.

What year is this car; still under warranty?

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If it’s still under warranty there should be a number for GM corporate in your Owner’s Manual. Call and escalate your problem. If it’s not under warranty you don’t need to go to a dealer, you can go to any good independent mechanic.

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What is wrong with the air filter hose? Did you accept the diagnosis and have it repaired? How old is the Equinox, and how many miles on it?

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2019 Equinox with just under 11,000 miles it. Had it since mid March this year. Light came on in May and had to make a trip back while replacement part ordered. Had PCV orifice in early June. Light back on in July and had it in again to dealer. They said the hose to air filter was loose. Back in last week of July for engine light warning on again. They said something about a lose air filter hose. Left there and light was off. Two hours later engine warning light was on again. I put up the hood and made sure all hoses to air filter were snugly in place, still engine light is on. Not sure what to do next, a little unnerving to drive it any distance with engine warning light on. Car is running fine but think I got a lemon.

Take it the dealer, get the complaint on record as many times as you can. If the dealer cannot fix it, you can get GM to buy it back. Research your states lemon laws and look in your owners manual for GM contact info. You deserve a proper operating car. Hire a lawyer that specializes in these type of complaints if you can’t get a solution.

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It would be super helpful to know what the engine code is. Perhaps you have an auto parts store near you and they can retrieve the code for you. Most do it for free and it only takes a couple of minutes.

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It’s clear to me that whoever’s diagnosing the car isn’t doing a proper job

Not all mechanics are equal

Not all mechanics even have diagnostic skills

Some guys are only good at brakes, oil changes and tires, for example . . .

I’ve known quite a few guys that have that “deer in the headlights” look when they’re given a “check engine light on” repair . . .

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As a follow on, you probably don’t need a lawyer. I didn’t in 1987 when I bought a Taurus. I researched lemon law requirements in my state after my new Taurus started acting up. In Maryland, I had to send copies of six Different receipts to Ford along with a letter requesting a new car. In the letter, I said that I would give them one more chance. When I took the car in for their final shot, the service advisor was relaxed and friendly until he started processing my car. He took a look at the computer screen and his eyes grew as large as saucers. I received the car with the item completely replaced rather than the silly repairs they continually botched. No more problems, and I’m sure I would have received a new Taurus to replace the one they were too foolish to fix right the first time. No lawyer needed, BTW.

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With 11,000 miles and purchased 4 months ago, this sounds like a used car purchase and this vehicle may be close to two years old. I don’t believe many states have used car lemon laws.

Adjust your comfort level. The light indicates a condition that will not lead to death. But in the end it might lead you to trade it in. Which may hurt your pocket book.

That was 1987. Theoretically you shouldn’t need one, but look at all of the troubles @thegreendrag0n has been having with his 2019 Honda Accord Hybrid…