Your tirecommendation for 2009 Camry Hybrid

toyota
camryhybrid

#1

Hybrid was bought for metropolitan driving.
But now almost all mileage is highways and interstates delivering blood to distant hospitals.

Does tire mileage rating mean anything?
Does low rolling resistance mean anything?

99% of the time it is on dry roads. Is a highway tire, which would get better fuel mileage, still produced?
(Expedition is used for transports in snow and blizzards.)
Thank you.


#2

I just got a set of Michelin LRR tires for my hybrid. Sounds like that would work well on yours. Go to tirerack for info.


#3

I agree 100% with @texases. You can’t go wrong with either tirerack or Michelin.


#4

Yes, tire mileage rating useful; just don’t expect a Michelin tire to actually last 100,000 miles in average driving. It would if you only drove the Interstate from L.A. to New York and back.

The mileage is a measure of the tire life going in a straight line. However it is a good measure to compare tires. Michelin usually last longer by far!


#5

What is brand/model of current tire. For info.


#6
"What is brand/model of current tire."
Thank you. I believe the OEM tire was Bridgestone or Michelin. Replaced with Perilli P215/60R16 95T M+S which was on sale. They are noisier and have not lasted very long.

#7

Ok, how many miles did u get on 1st set? Where are u now on 2nd set.


#8

Now at 148K
I documented orginal tire life but cannot find it.
It was beyond expected mileage.
We all drive the vehicle gently and keep it on good surfaces.
Thank you.


#9

Uh, ok, approx is fine. 80k on set 1, 65k so far on set 2. Not splitting hairs here. 148k on 2 sets is great. Don’t u think?


#10
"148k on 2 sets is great. Don't u think?"
Yes. (Am beyond when the Perilli tires should have been replaced.)

#11

This tire comes highly recommended as a general all purpose tire for hybrids with the bonus, it has excellent snow traction.


#12

The LRR tires will usually give up traction(and other things) for MPGs


#13

My Michelins were top rated overall by CR, so I’m not giving up anything (except some extra $$).


#14

Thank you, all.
We have taken your advice and purchased Michelin Defender tires at Discount Tire.
They look low pressure, so I will see what higher pressure can be used.


#15

"They look low pressure, so I will see what higher pressure can be used. "

Huh?


#16
Huh?
After driving away, in a hospital parking lot they look as though not inflated to their proper pressure.

#17

@RobertGift

“They look low pressure, so I will see what higher pressure can be used.”

How about inflating them to the correct tire pressures listed on the sticker on your door jamb?

“After driving away, in a hospital parking lot they look as though not inflated to their proper pressure.”

If in doubt, check the tire pressure with a decent quality tire pressure gauge.


#18

Yep, looks don’t matter.


#19

Does the mileage rating mean anything? yes, it does. It means it passed a test to get that rating. However, tire manufacturers are only penalized if they OVER value the rating. There is no penalty for under valuing it.

LRR? It’s a relative term. It means: “Compared to other tires with similar treadwear and traction characteristics, these consume less fuel.” Yes, it is possible for a tire labeled “LRR” to consume a lot of fuel - and it is possible for tires not so labeled to get great fuel economy.

Just be aware of the fact that treadwear, traction, and rolling resistance form a technology triangle and to get good performance is one area means sacrificing another.


#20

“We have taken your advice and purchased Michelin Defender tires at Discount Tire.”

That was a good decision, Robert.
I purchased a set of Defenders several months ago, & I consider them to be…incredible.
While they are rated as a LRR tire, they are not one of the absolute lowest in this regard, but in exchange for a bit more rolling resistance you get excellent traction, an incredibly smooth ride, very low noise levels, very fast steering response, and very good handling.

“They look low pressure, so I will see what higher pressure can be used.”

Huh? The days of judging tire pressure by appearances has not been valid for at least 20 years.
A radial tire can look somewhat underinflated, and yet be perfectly inflated.

You need to buy a good-quality tire pressure gauge, and you need to refer to the placard affixed to the driver’s door jamb. As long as the tires are inflated to at least the same pressure as Toyota recommends on that door jamb label, then you are good to go. I prefer to inflate my tires to ~3 lbs over the recommended pressure, but that is a personal preference.

Don’t judge tire pressure by appearances, and don’t inflate them to the pressure listed on the tire’s sidewall!