Wiper motor not working on Chrysler


#1

It’s a 2005 Chrysler Sebring with a 2.4 DOHC. A couple weeks ago I tried to use the wipers and nothing happened - at all. The next day the gauges inside the car went hay wire, started flashing on and off. Turned out the car needed a new battery and alternator. Replaced both and the car has been perfectly fine - except for the wipers.
I checked the wiper fuse and it wasn’t blown so I pulled the cowl, unplugged the motor, turned the key on, turned the wiper switch to full speed and then tested for voltage at the plug and got almost 12 volts when testing several terminal combinations. I thought for sure I had it figured out so went ahead and bought a remanufactured wiper motor but nothing happened when I plugged it in. I thought maybe since I didn’t mount it it wasn’t grounded so went ahead and did that and still nothing. Thinking maybe it was defective I returned it and went to a different auto parts store and bought another one, hooked it up and got the same results. So then I tested all nine relays in the relay control center and they all passed. So now I’m thinking the only thing left to test is the wiper switch. Am I correct?

And also I’d love to bench test the original motor just to verify that it works but don’t know which terminals to connect to. I’ve searched the internet with two different browsers and came up with nothing. So if anyone knows which terminals to use please let me know. The motor in question is a Bosch 05-02-14 41. And then underneath it has 0390 241 7411 12V 058 written on it. The terminals are labeled: 31b, 31, 53 and 53b. And since the OE replacement motor for this car is a Cardone 40-3026, if someone knows which terminals to use to bench test that one, I could then figure out which terminals to use on the Bosch. Thanks


#2

I don’t know how your Chrysler is wired, but on the 1978 Oldsmobile I used to own, there was always 12 volts at the motor as long as the ignition switch was on. The wiper switch completed the circuit to the ground. That would lead me to check the switch. Turn the switch on and, with an ohm meter, test for continuity to ground for the connector that isn’t indicating 12 volts.


#3

Test for continuity to ground at the wiper motor plug or at the wiper switch?


#4

At the motor connector the Brown/white wire is low speed (12 volts), Red/yellow is high speed, tan/red is park switch and black is ground. It sounds like you have power but no ground. With the switch on and the motor connected test the ground wire, if there is power the ground wire is broke or the ground screw is loose. See “G103” in the diagram below.


#5

The ground for the wiper motor is controlled thru the body control module.

Tester


#6

The BCM controls the relays, not the ground.


#7

I haven’t had a chance to check the ground yet (car is being used by family member) but did manage to bench test the motor and it works! I’d like to clean out the old grease from the gearbox and repack it with fresh before mounting it back on the car but I’m not exactly sure what to use. Did a couple google searches and people say to use dielectric grease. Does this sound like the way to go? Can someone recommend a specific product/brand?


#8

I just installed a new wiper switch and the motor still won’t turn. I also took a test light to the wiper motor body and connected it to the positive battery terminal and the light lit up so I know the motor is grounded.

What else could it be?


#9

Now that you have the test light out, test for power and grounds at the wiper motor connector with the switch on in each position.


#10

Already did that but with my multimeter.

Here’s what I got:

Wiper switch set to ‘‘Hi’’ ignition switch on:

black wire plus tan & red wire: 11.90 volts
tan & red wire plus red & yellow wire: 11.85 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white wire plus tan & red wire: 11.84 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white wire plus tan & red wire: 11.84 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white plus tan & red: 11.83 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white plus tan & red: 11.81 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white plus tan & red: 11.80 volts
tan & red plus black wire: 11.79 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Next setting down:
brown & white plus tan & red: 11.76 volts
black wire plus tan & red wire: 11.76 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)

Wiper switch ‘‘off’’ ignition switch still on:
brown & white plus tan & red: 11.74 volts
black wire plus tan & red wire: 11.74 volts
(no other combinations showed voltage)


#11

You have power at the park switch sense wire, that doesn’t power the motor. No power on Brown/white or Red/yellow wires so test inputs and output at the wiper relays. When testing for power connect your negative test lead to the negative battery cable.


#12

When I move the wiper switch to ‘‘Hi’’ the wiper relay ‘‘clicks’’ and when I switch to the next lowest setting it ‘‘clicks’’ again but those are the only two settings that I can get it to make any noise. So there’s definitely power going to the relay but it appears only on the two highest wiper speed settings.


#13

There are two wiper relays, high/low and wiper on/off.

If the relay clicks this suggests there is power on the control side of the relay but doesn’t prove if there is power on the input/output side. Look at the pins on the relay. Pins 85 and 86 switch the relay on/off. Pin 30 is normally power from a fuse and pin 87 is connected to the device. this case the wiper motor.


#14

I’ve already tested all nine relays in the relay/fuse box under the hood. I connected a jumper wire to terminal 86 and the positive terminal of the car’s battery and connected a jumper wire to terminal 85 and the batterie’s negative terminal. They all made a ‘‘click’’ and then I tested for continuity between terminals 30 and 87 with the jumper wires still connected and all nine relays passed with flying colors.


#15

I rarely find the need to test relays. Test the inputs and outputs in the connector below the relay in the relay box. You must find out if you have power to and from the relay.


#16

If I don’t have power to and from the relay what’s the next thing to check?


#17

If there is no power to the relay check the fuse and wiring. If there is no power out of the relay check the control side to see if the relay is being switched on.


#18

This is far out, but could the transmission from the wiper motor to the wiper arms be binding? I know that you had electrical problems, so it would be a rather unlikely coincidence that this would be the problem. However, it is worth checking.


#19

No. The wiper arms aren’t even hooked up right now.


#20

The ground may be switched through a relay.