Tom and Ray in Cars 3


#1

I just saw Cars 3 today, and the Magliozzi brothers were portrayed again as a Dodge Dart and Dodge A100. My question regard’s Tom’s lines, Cars 3 went into production in the middle of 2014, and Tom passed away later that year. Were the lines used in movie, simply lines that weren’t used from the first Cars movie or was Tom able to record his lines for this movie before he passed? In the movie they used some of Paul Newman’s unused lines from the first Cars movie, and I was wondering if the did the same for Tom,


#2

Haven’t seen it but my grand kids did last weekend.


#3

I saw it and was wondering the same thing.

One thing that movies have done in the past for sequels - is to use lines from previous movies. Maybe even lines that were cut from the final release.

Paul Newman and George Carlin - also died before Cars 3 and their voices are there.

If the voice of Tom confuses you…have you seen Rogue One? They brought back a General from Star Wars episode 4 - the actor (Peter Cushing) died over 20 years ago. Not just the voice.


#4

It won’t be long before any actor, living or dead, will be able to added to any moving as desired. Peter Cushing is just one good example. Imagine the anxiety of a current actor being replaced by the image and voice of a long dead actor simulated by a computer. I am thinking new Marilyn Monroe or John Wayne movies in 2018!


#5

Well, there have already been commercials aired for several years featuring the images and voices (?) of Marilyn and Wayne, so it shouldn’t be a quantum leap to expand that type of technology to a full-length film.


#6

The ‘scanning’ of human actors was already a large part of a movie


#7

Unfortunately there’s an extremely ugly side to this technology.


#8

Yes, but the folks who control Marilyn’s estate love it.
In death, she is worth–literally–thousands of times more than she was in life, and some people are becoming incredibly wealthy from this electronic grave-robbing routine.


#9

Now that we are into movie talk, there was an article on new software that can mimic a person’s voice after only a few short lines of the real voice. After that you can have them say anything and it would hold up in court with voice recognition software. Very very very dangerous and what would that do to royalties for the actors? Are we entering a period where real actors will be redundant? No more Hollywood?


#10

I think we are very very close. Take the Marvel comics franchise movies. The out-of-this-world scenes (or Computer Generated Imagery) dominate the movie already. This includes much of the actor themselves. Then take a peek at the best animated films and the amazing detail rendered for the big screen. Hair follicles, lug nuts on cars, realistic surfacing. The technology is rapidly merging.

As for the owners of the rights… Michael Jackson, Elvis, Elizabeth Taylor are all in the top 5 grossing artists. Good for their families…


#11

Unfortunately the ugly side is uglier then that.


#12

Related to that, there is supposed to be a new phone-related scam that involves the person (actually a recording) asking if you can hear her when you answer the phone. If you say “yes”, they allegedly capture that and later use it to claim that you acquiesced to some kind of deal. I can’t say for sure whether these allegations are true, but they have been reported by several consumer-oriented reporters.

When I get an obvious scam call, I just hang up, and–now–if I don’t catch on immediately that it is a scam call, at least I am very careful to NOT say “yes” to any questions when a stranger calls me.


#13

Can you please elaborate?
:confused:


#14

"Related to that, there is supposed to be a new phone-related scam that involves the person (actually a recording) asking if you can hear her when you answer the phone. If you say “yes”, they allegedly capture that and later use it to claim that you acquiesced to some kind of deal. "

While that’s possible, it seems more scare than reality. People say “yes” all the time on the phone, no special question needed, and no major breakout of fraud has resulted.


#15

I sent you a message.


#16

That is true, and all of the news reports stated that there has been no verified fraud related to this phenomenon…yet.

Snopes researched these stories, and their conclusion was “unproven”.


#17

I’ve received at least a half dozen of those calls. Never said yes…I just wait to hear them keep talking.

The biggest fraud right now is the Credit Card debt relief and the IRS. Both of those scams have actually collected MILLIONS from consumers.

I think the IRS scam is funny…They say that if you don’t pay they’re going to send the cops.

Rules #1 - NEVER EVER give your credit card information over the phone to unsolicited calls. NEVER.


#18

Yeah, but sometimes it is fun to play with them for awhile–like a cat with a mouse–if you have the time and are in a perverse mood.
Scammer: Please give us your credit card number
Me: Sure…please hold on while I get it
(I then make them wait at least 5 minutes)
Me: Okay, here it is. Please copy this down. Are you ready?
Scammer: Yes
Me: Okay, here it is. 123-456-F#@k You!


#19

As tempting as that is, there is a case where the scammers ‘SWATTED’ the caller who messed with them, reported a crime at that person’s location, just to be extra-nasty.


#20

I’ve done that twice over the years…I was bored…I kept the guy trying to sell me a bogus time-share on the line for at least 20 minutes. He go so frustrated with me he - he started cursing and then just hung up.

Here’s one way to handle it