Starter problem.. any suggestions?!

starters

#1

93 honda accord lx 4cyl manual 4 dr sedan. ok so i checked my car yesterday my car wouldnt start or crank per say. manny people told me it was the battery or the alternator i jump started it nothing i change the battery n put a fairly new batter and nothing.the only way it would start is if i pushed it witch manual car are obviously know for push starting… it ended up being that my starter wouldnt crank…ok so any simple suggestions i should follow to make it crank? can it be that the starter is stuck?.any thing would help at this point


#2

If the starter won’t work it is either NOT getting 12V or the Bendix is worn out.

It’s also possible the Bendix gear is stuck in the ring gear. Perhaps the ring gear has a chipped or broken tooth.


#3

Add: you may have a bad voltage regulator on (in) the the starter.


#4

A bad starter. The solenoid is part of the starter, and is replaced with in. You can find remanufactured ones for about $75.


#5

If the neutral safety switch (clutch pedal) is bad, it will prevent the starter from cranking. Do you have electrical power to “everything else” ?


#6

Remove your starter and take it up to one of the auto parts stores that test them. Have them test it. I think it is starter.


#7

im my opinion, but i am not a “real” mechanic!, i just do my own work on my cars.

and this is considering the car as a whole (it runs reasonably well, and has no other significant issues)
if you are going to go to the trouble to take the starter off to have it tested, it is short money to just get a remanufactured one from the local parts store, as other mentioned about $75.00 and you have eliminated this as a future problem (probably for the [rest of the] life of this car.)

if you are going to take the time effort and have the skill to change out the starter, then why not just replace it? they are cheap! yes, there are other possibilities, such as a chipped ring gear, or bent ring gear, but (again in my opinion) the age of the car would make that not worth repairing, but a new starter should be able to last for a while, to keep you going.


#8

Here is a link to show you how a basic starter system works. By jumpering the small red wire go to the solenoid directly to the battery it will bypass the ignition switch and safety switch. If the starter works ok doing that, then you need to check the ignition and safety switch wiring for a problem. Be sure the tranny is in neutral if you do that.


#9

If the battery and its cables are OK at both ends, the copper contacts inside the starter’s solenoid may need attention. One wears down more than the other. When you turn the key to Start the plunger slides as far as it can, but it is sometimes not far enough to to make it touch both contacts simultaneously.

You may hear the sliding sound inside the solenoid if you carefully get close to the starter motor while someone turns the key to Start. Sometimes hitting the solenoid with a tool handle will temporarily get the solenoid working again.

I would take the whole starter motor to a local auto electric shop and have them test it AND inspect the contacts and plunger inside the solenoid. That is an easy repair for them to do. I don’t trust rebuilt starters off the shelf, but I would trust my own starter that is properly repaired.


#10

If we need to eliminate any future problems then why not just go out and buy a new car of your choice! We have become a R and R society. I would much rather remove and test than just replace it. I’m on a limited income and I can not afford replacing something just because I removed it. Test it and if bad then replace it. It should only take ten minutes to remove and another ten to replace if it checks out all right.