Stalling Volvo

volvo
940

#1

So here’s the deal, I bought this 93 Volvo 940 turbo station wagon about a month ago. It was stalling when I got it so I replaced the rotted hoses, fuel filter and cleaned the fuel system. The fuel pump was replaced a little before I got it. 2000 miles later it is stalling again at any speed mostly when the rpms go up and on hills. We are trying to replace the map sensor but can not find it anywhere under the hood. Does this car even have a map sensor and if so where is it located… We are also trying to clean the throttle sensor but cant seem to get it out without taking a bunch of other pieces apart, is there a trick to this. Is there anything else it could be… We are currently stranded in IL and could use a bit of advice. Thanks…


#2

You might find some ideas here:


#3

Thank you, I’m checking it out.


#4

Stalling can be caused by a lot of things as you might expect. Replacing the battery for example can cause stalling in some cars, until the computer learns how to idle again. Your car has sophisticated diagnostic software built in which will test the various parts and output diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) telling you problems it finds. You paid for it, so might as well use it. You may need to find someone with a Volvo scan tool to get the full benefit. Especially if this is a pre-OBD II, which is probably the case. But you should be able to find a Volvo mechanic who will plug the appropriate Volvo scan tool into the diagnostic port, and let the diagnostic software tell you what is wrong. Or there’s probably a way to read the DTC’s without a scan tool, using a blinking light somewhere. The experts here can help you decipher what the scan tool tells you.

If you don’t want to go the scan tool route, you could bring all the routine engine maintenance up to date, then if the stalling continues, clean the gunk from the throttle body and clean/replace the idle air control. Who knows, could get lucky. The problem is that often this “try replacing stuff until it works” method ends in you running out of money before you run out of things to replace.

Took a quick look at the specs. The primary air induction sensor for your car (to measure intake airflow) appears to be a MAF, rather than a MAP. But there is a reference to a “manifold vacuum/pressure sensor” under "computers and control systems’. Not sure exactly what this does, or where it is. Could be a spec mistake too.


#5

Thank you… I’m checking it out. :slight_smile: