Name that hose clamp (and other things)


#1

what style hose clamp is this (see pic)? I got this hose clamp from the hose attached tothe brake fluid reservoir that leads to the clutch master cylinder. not sure of the exact dimensions, but it is roughly 15mm diameter, and the clamp itself says (to the best of my ability to read it) “14.5 DETRAT”. It appears that the clamp is slipped over the hose, then cinched up until it clicks into place on the third tooth down. The other teeth are sort of bent in, and are not shaped the same. I can attempt to get a better pic if anyone asks, but hopefully this is adequate.

… what style / make / etc. hose clamp is this?

UPDATE : some other tangential discussion arose, so I adjusted the title. Thanks for tangential discussion, as a novice I appreciate it.

another UPDATE:
it appears that the “DETRAT” inscription I described above might actually be “OET…”, as I have a new pinch clamp that was manufactured by Oetiker, and that one has “OET” on it.

not sure what the “RAT” part means, or if it is illegible. I will probably buy a new one Real Soon Now to check.

another UPDATE:

here’s a video of a guy installing an Oetiker style pinch clamp using Oetiker-style pliers at 4:34 (I cued it up, but it starts at the beginning):


#2

That’s a crimp type hose clamp.

When the clamp is installed, a special tool is used to crimp the loop on the clamp to tighten it, and at the same time the tool dimples the top of the loop so the clamp remains tight.

Tester


#3

Go to a hardware store and you will find these screw in clamps in all sizes.


#4

Yep, use it to find the correct size stainless screw clamp:


#5

Seconding the others here, if your intent is to buy one exactly like that, that’s usually not the best course for a diy’er. "There’s a variety of clamps used in automobiles. Those crimp type clamps like the one in your photo are used during new manufacture b/c they are quicker to install. But the manufacturer has the exact tools for that clamp, and the diy’er usually doesn’t. Better to switch to the type of clamp above, which I think is called a “worm drive” screw clamp. I had a VW Rabbit years ago and all the clamps were the crimp type. Very annoying. One day I just up and replaced them all with the worm drive screw type. BTW, its easier to use the right size socket over the hex head of the screw when installing these worm drive clamps, rather than using a slotted screwdriver.


#6

I too prefer the worm drive clamps like Tex suggested. Just don’t overtighten them. Don’t cut into the hose.

Manufacturers use clamps that can be installed with a single action for fast throughput in production. I usually replace them with worm drives if I do any work.


#7

One advantage to those crimp clamps is that they don’t seem to loosen up over time. I also often use brass ferrules (used on cutting torch hoses) from a welding supply house.
Those ferrules require a special pair of Vise-Grip pliers to crimp them but once in place a hose is on there for the count unless it’s cut off.


#8

What is a likely manufacturer of this clamp and the tool?

Is the tool going to be a fancy item from Snap-On, for example?


#9

In case you care, this is called an “Oetiker clamp” I believe. A couple of decades ago (and what feels like lives ago) I had to purchase some Oetiker clamps and a crimper to fix a soft drink dispensing machine when I managed a restaurant.

If you google “Oetiker clamp”, you will find a zillion of these and suppliers for the crimping tool.


#10

@oblivion perfect, thanks!


#11

Crimp hose clamps serve a purpose during manufacturing. When they have to be removed I replace them with stainless steel “worm drive” clamps. They can be tightened easily or removed and replaced several times.


#12

Car companies put those plier clamps because they expand and contract as the coolant temperature changes. Its also easy to install. A worm gear clamp does not expand or contract but provides a very tight option. Just be careful not to over tighten it or you will need a new hose.


#13

It looks like there are wire crimping tools, PEX clamps out there too - will one of the crimping tools like at Harbor Freight with a PEX clamp work like an Oetiker clamp? The Oetiker clamp is pricey.


#14

Just go to a hardware shop and you will find them for pennies.


#15

Crimpers are specific to the job and parts they crimp. If you’re not doing this day in/out why are you hung up on it? Worm clamps have been used forever and do the job just fine. They cost a buck or two and you likely already own the tool to tighten them.

At work we have cabinets full of crimpers that are specific to a terminal or ring. They cost hundreds apiece. Many of them appear almost identical to the untrained eye. But if you use the wrong one, the quality of the crimp is affected.

If you feel it’s necessary to use the OEM clamp then why chintz out on the improper tool to perform the work? For example, a PEX crimp ring is not going to work right so is inferior to even the lowly worm clamp you’re against using. It’s designed to crimp PEX tubing not automotive hoses…


#16

@JuniorMint, why are you so adamant about these clamps? Even high-end restoration projects don’t use these hose clamps. The stainless steel worm gear clamps are a very accepted alternative, easy to use, and widely available.


#17

Yep, forget crimping. Get the screw clamps, they’re better for what you’re doing.


#18

when it comes down to it, all I asked was to get the name/make of the clamp - so we are done - though I am happy to have gotten a lot more than what I asked for, so thanks.


#19

when it comes down to it, all I asked was to get the name/make of the clamp - so we are done -though I am happy to have gotten a lot more than what I asked for, so thanks.

Short memory? I didn’t bother responding until you asked this follow-on question:

It looks like there are wire crimping tools, PEX clamps out there too - will one of the crimping tools like at Harbor Freight with a PEX clamp work like an Oetiker clamp? The Oetiker clamp is pricey.


#20

@TwinTurbo yes thanks…

… since I am here now, I’ll ask this - is the worm gear hose clamp best for the clutch/brake fluid system? air is critical here, while with coolant not so much I think.

also, I’d want to use the worm gear hose clamps that have a smooth inner diameter.