Hydrongen assist conversion kit


#1

Has anyone had any experience with the hydrogen assist conversion kit that has been advertised in Newsweek?


#2

SCAM, beyond any doubt. There are many other posts on this topic.

I don’t see any such ad in Newsweek, 3 Mar edition.


#3

Has Newsweek lowered themselves that far? I believe Popular Mechanics did have the add for that SCAM.


#4

I’ll wait till I actually see the ad.


#5

No magazine or newspaper or TV station or radio station can check all the ads they run for veracity. To verify would be un-American. You are free to be as big a fool as you want around here. BTW, I am not implying that you are a fool, Joseph. I have a high opinion of you despite the occasional disagreements we have. ;^)


#6

Auto accessory ads don’t seem to be Newsweeks thing. I suspect the cost of an ad there is more than the scam artists can afford.

Newsweek ads tend to be drugs, funds, large companies like Microsoft, BASF.


#7

it’s probably a form that’s been written out that only needs a couple blanks filled in, kinda like those companies that put out tons of personalized letters.
“Dear _____
we at XYZ company would like to thank you for your business in _____(city), ____(state)
blahblahblah
sincerely
______”


#8

In all likelihood, it’s another f***ing bulls*** scam.


#9

I tried it at Bikini Atoll. Luckily, the government covered it up by saying it was a new technology that worked well.


#10

Really?
they stole mine while I was inside eating breakfast. I seen someone outside around my car after I wrote how wonderful the product was. Somehow, they broke into my car without breaking the glass, popped my hood, stole the device, but left everything else alone, course I stopped them before they done anything else to the car.
Now I’m stuck with that PICC, turbonator, slick50, acetone, and magnets on my fuel line. I went from 3000000 mpg down to 1500000 mpg