How to fix a waxing error?


#1

I washed my car, and then used a water-absorbing towel to dry off. I let it dry a bit more in the sun. Then I pulled it out of the sun to cool for two hours to cool down the body before waxing. Finally, I gave it a real nice waxing. When I pulled back into the sun, I noticed there are several visible water marks on the car’s body from the minerals in the hose water that had dried. I unknowingly waxed right over them. Tried gently rubbing, but they don’t come out. Re-waxing over the top of it didn’t help. So it appears now the water marks are temporarily protected under the wax?

Any fix for this waxing mistake?


#2

What kind of wax did you use?


#3

Mother’s Brazilian Carnauba.


#4

Almost any polishing (cleaning) compound will cut through that and remove the water spots.


#5

Be careful with the term “polishing compound”. It’s used to denote a micron-level abrasive used to final-finish new paint as well as often used for car waxes. “Compound” denotes the abrasive type.

My suggestion would be to get a cleanser that removes wax (any parts store will have one), remove the wax and clean the spots, and start over. I’d avoid anything at all abrasive.


#6

I’ve never used it, but I see that Rust-Oleum has a wax and tar remover for cars, so I guess you could use that to remove the wax, use a clay bar to remove the water spots, and wax again.


#7

In the paint and body section at AutoZone, they have a wax stripper.


#8

Clay kit by mcguire might work.


#9

Is the water spot one you can see or one you can feel??

If you can feel it, it is a mineral deposit that will come off with a little white vinegar mixed half and half with water and a little car wash soap. Wash on, work it with a sponge and rinse.

If its the type you can only see, it has etched the paint. Polishing compound will usually get it out. Really bad ones may actually need a little rubbing compound first, then polishing, then clearcoat polish and wax.


#10

Excellent point as usual, Mustangman.
+1


#11

If it doesn’t bother you much, just leave it alone and deal with it at the next wax job.


#12

Vinegar removes wax.


#13

Yes, vinegar does remove wax, very effectively!

Oddly enough, so does dish soap. That’s why car wash soaps are different. Washing with Dish soap is a great first step before a re-wax or a re-paint.


#14

Depends on the dish soap. I used Ivory liquid for years and it never removed my wax. Dish soaps with citrus additives, “lemon scent” soaps, will remove the wax, however.