Honda passport exhuast


#1

Buying passport was worse decision ever but i have it now so lets move on. I Think the cat is clogged, the check engine light is on. The code came back with several options but outflow seems to make since because there is a slight veriation in the sound its making. When i take off from a stop its very sluggish no power and takes for ever to shift. Really high rpm’s and finally when it shifts a lot of torque happens so much that it broke me stabalizer bar. My question is its cold and snowy out i have no garage, no lift, and no welder can i just knock a hole with hamer and screw driver into cat? Ram the screwdriver around inside cat then take some muffler tape and cover the whole? I have thrown an enormous amout of money into the passport and i am done. I will post codes later have to go get them again. It might not have been the stabalizer bar that broke will post a pic of that. As you can see the under side is rusted badly. Transmission is new only 20000 miles on it professionaly done. The passport is the same as the isuzu rodeo and amigo. I am in a position that i can’t buy a new vehicle. Bought the passport one and half years ago have spent like 4 grand since then just keeping it running. So your right it needs to go but cant at this time.


#2

You can do this. But you’ll need to call a tow truck after you do.
And the problem may not even be the catalytic converter!

A few points:
You never listed any of the codes or asked for suggestions to correct them, so I can only assume you’re not interested in doing so. Which means your vehicle will never run right, will keep getting worse, and you’ll constantly be frustrated hoping it cures itself.

A Passport’s engine lacks the power to break its stab bar. As a matter of fact, if the links’ ends are articulating freely and the stab bar rotating freely in its bushings, no engine will break the stab bar. Can’t happen. Something else has happened for which there’s no clue in your post. Since you’ve said nothing about driving environment or chassis problems, I know not what to suggest.

Sorry, but the only suggestion I can make is to sell it “as-is” and replace it with something else. Perhaps the next buyer will be willing to spend the necessary bucks to get it properly fixed and have a nice vehicle.


#3

I’ve Never Heard Of A Honda Passport.
What Is The Model-Year?

Most converter shells are pretty thick. I doubt a screw driver can be hammered into it. Besides, once you break up some of the contents, what’s going to keep that from clogging things?

I think it’s a “Don’t try this at home” thing, since you don’t have proper tools or a facility to work in.

CSA


#4

“I’ve Never Heard Of A Honda Passport.”

It is identical to the Isuzu Rodeo.
Before Honda developed their first SUV, they had Isuzu build a bunch of Rodeos with Honda badges on them.

In sort of a fair exchange, Honda built some of their first generation Odysseys with Isuzu badges.
Those were Isuzu’s Oasis model, and I’ll bet that you’ve never seen one of those rare birds!


#5

The OP’s description of high RPMs coupled with very late shifts causes me to think that the problem is more likely to be transmission-related, rather than Catalytic Converter-related.
Has the OP checked the color, odor, and level of the trans fluid?

I could be wrong, but in the absence of those missing diagnostic codes, those are my thoughts at the current time.


#6

Passport was a rebadged Isuzu rom 1991 to 2002 so we are talking about at a 14 year old vehicle that wasn’t much to start with. The OP doesn’t like the thing so I suggest just trade it because it might not be worth the money to fix it.


#7

"It is identical to the Isuzu Rodeo."
What’s that?

You’ll have to forgive me as we have dealers or vehicles from those manufacturers around here.
CSA


#8

Just put Honda Passport in google and you will find a Wikipedia article.


#9

“The OP’s description of high RPMs coupled with very late shifts causes me to think that the problem is more likely to be transmission-related, rather than Catalytic Converter-related.”

Also, this car(?) could also be in Limp Mode with the engine power reduced by the ECM. That would explain the revving and delayed, harsh shifting. As you said, we need codes and information about CEL illumination.

What Model-Year is it?

CSA


#10
Buying passport was worse decision ever but i have it now so lets move on.

you are giving yourself some competition with,

knock a hole with hamer and screw driver into cat? Ram the screwdriver around inside cat then take some muffler tape and cover the whole?
I have thrown an enormous amout of money into the passport

Sounds like you need a competent mechanic.


#11

2001 honda passport


#12

“You’ll have to forgive me as we have dealers or vehicles from those manufacturers around here.”

I am going to assume you meant that you don’t have dealers for those vehicles in your neck of the woods.
Well, in fact, nobody else does either!
Isuzu stopped selling cars and SUVs in the country several years ago. Only their COE commercial trucks are left in the US marketplace.


#13

Honda has stopped messing with the passport and moved onto the pilot.


#14

@hounch101
Is The “Check Engine Light” On?
If so, have you checked for DTCs (fault codes)?
CSA


#15

Isuzu no longer sells in this country.


#16

The high shift points are likely due indirectly to the lack of power. You’re depressing the accelerator further to compensate for the lack of power. This in turn moves the throttle position sensor farther which tells the transmission to raise the shift points. I suspect there is nothing wrong with the transmission.

Also, there is no connection between your lack of power and your broken stabilizer bar.

You really need to report what codes you’re getting.

I’m wondering, with such severe rust, if it’s worth fixing.


#17

That vehicle is not drivable due to the broken rear suspension trailing arm mount.

There is a recall to repair this, if your lucky perhaps they will give you market value for the vehicle rather than repairing it.

12-003

January 18, 2012
Applies To:
1998-2001 Passport - Check the iN VIN status for eligibility
Safety Recall: Corrosion On Lower Trailing Link Front Brackets

Over time, in areas that use road salt, * excessive corrosion can develop on or near the brackets attaching the lower trailing links to the frame. If the corrosion reaches a heavy stage, a clunking noise may be heard during acceleration and braking. In rare cases of severe corrosion, a trailing link could separate from the frame. If this happens, vehicle handling could be affected, increasing the risk of a crash.


#18

Here is the parts diagram, the rear suspension trailing arms hold the rear axle in position. You can see the stabilizer bar/link in your picture is above the disconnected trailing arm.


#19

I didn’t see the photo. Was that edited in? Looks like the bracket holding the training arm rotted right off the frame.
I absolutely agree with Nevada… this thing is not and never again will be safe to drive. Cancel my original suggestion to sell it “as is”. Sell it by the pound to the scrapman.


#20

“this thing is not and never again will be safe to drive”

+1
For every bit of rust that is visible, there is at least twice as much that isn’t visible.
This rusted hulk needs to be towed to a junkyard.