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Sun Shade Use

Is it better to use a sun shade to protect the interior of a car or not. If you park all day in a sunny location where the temperatures reach the high 90’s does it make a difference?

It does for me ( black truck in New Mexico sun ). It prevents ; steering wheel too hot to touch, dash top faded and cracked, upholstery fade, and it sure feels ever so slightly cooler in there.

I agree with Ken. These things do make a difference.
Just remember to remove it before you drive away!

;-))

How do I get my husband to realize he is jeopardizing the interior of our new Audi TT by not using a sun shade?

Can you send me a link to some research that says sun shades will keep the interior of your car from deteriorating?

I could probably find a link to support the idea that the sun could cause the dashboard of a vehicle to be damaged (along with my testimony that I’ve seen damage caused by the sun), but if someone can’t see how obvious that possibility is, that person isn’t going to accept supporting evidence from a link on the internet.

Note: it is also a good idea to leave windows slightly opened.

Thanks–You are absolutely right!

I guess you can put a thermometer in the car with and without the sun shade on days that have the same max temp and see if the reading varies. The hot steering is the part that bugs me most. In the old days cars had leather top dashes and they would crack easily. Nowadays they are all plastic, they fade but don’t crack. I guess that is less of an issue for me but still important. By the time the dash had faded so had the paint on the roof. Nothing like having a good garage.

The 1977-1989 fullsize GM cars will go down in history as some of the most indestructable vehicles. However, if you visit a wrecking yard you will see that most their dashboard crash padding is cracked.

I had a 1984 Impala and a 1988 Caprice, and used the sun shades wherever I could. I only ended up with small cracks when disposing of the cars after 12 and 19 years. Others looked like a nest of squirrels had made themselves at home on the dashboards and built their nests.

Take your husband to a wrecking yard where cars sit outside all the time and show him the dasboards.

What I Am Missing? Why Is An Audi Different Than A Maybach Or A Ford When It Comes To Sunshine?

These little sun shades look like they’d be a pain to horse around with. I say if you like them, use them. I say if your husband thinks they’re silly and doesn’t like them, then that’s fine if he chooses not to use one.

We’re talking about an Audi and from reading other questions posted here they are subject to other problems generally more irritating than a little sunshine. Cars are made to be driven and parked in all types of weather conditons. Drive it.

CSA

I don’t think he is putting your new car in jeopardy. What he is doing isn’t destructive; it is just careless. Saying that he is putting your car in jeopardy makes you look a little over-dramatic. It is true the dashboard will last longer if you use a sun shade, but this isn’t the same as putting the car in jepoardy. If you keep the car long enough, it might hurt the resale value, slightly. If he doesn’t care about that, you can’t make him. Just use the sun shade when you drive in or ride in the car, and let him do his thing when you aren’t there.

This is too trivial to make a big deal over. Pick your battles, and let this one go. Save your ire for more important issues.

Note to Joe Guy: If the OP lives in the sub tropics (like Florida), where you get surprise rain storms regularly, don’t ever leave the windows slightly open. Also, if you don’t want the car to be stolen or burglarized, leaving the windows open is a BAD idea.

Note to Joe Guy: If the OP lives in the sub tropics (like Florida), where you get surprise rain storms regularly, don’t ever leave the windows slightly open. Also, if you don’t want the car to be stolen or burglarized, leaving the windows open is a BAD idea.

By ‘slightly open’ I mean it is a good idea to leave the window about 1 or two inches down on a hot day. That will not increase the chances of a car being stolen or burglarized and will allow some of the heat to escape.

If you expect rainstorms that are strong enough to seep through a 1 or 2 inch opening, then I’m assuming people are smart enough to know that my advice may not apply to them.

The dashboard gets hottest when the front of the car points sorta south; the sun shines directly on the dash. You and hubby can see the film build up on the windshield. It does it all year long, but especially during the summer. The phenomenon is called outgassing. When plastics get hot, the plasticizer evaporates more quickly. It sticks to something with a lower temperature, like the windshield. Since glass transmits or reflects most of the light, it doesn’t get as hot as the dash, which only absorbs or reflects the light. So, the proof is in your own car every day.

BTW, the plasticizer is use to make the plastic flexible. As it evaporates, the plastic becomes less flexible. Eventually it can shrink from mass loss due to evaporation. These plastics can have 10% or more plasticizer in them. Couple that with the more brittle material, and you get the cracked dash boards that Docnick mentioned.

Catherine, you’re creating a problem here for not much of a good reason. Most people don’t use shades, and get by fine. If you’re wanting to go to battle over your car’s interior, you stand to lose. Not worth it!

Based on the apparent wisdom of some of the people who come here for advice, I would never make that assumption. Do you remember the sage saying about what happens when you assume things?

Where I work, the local police give us a routine crime report, and the most crimes on the report are “crimes of opportunity,” where someone makes it easy for the thief. Leaving your window cracked as much as two inches makes it far easier for amateurs to break in with a coat hanger. Putting your windows up makes it more difficult. If you don’t think that will lead to “crimes of opportunity,” perhaps you should ask someone who works in law enforcement if you don’t believe me.

I think I can safely assume that the car will be parked in all 4 directions, not just south.

Anyway, we don’t really use sunshades (we live in California) and our cars are fine.

Boy, it looks like people are either for or against using sunshades. I have a 10 year old volvo that looks new inside because I consistently use a shade–I suppose some of you don’t plan to keep your cars that long or don’t care what they look and feel like. But thanks for all the info…

Sure, it’s up to you. I have a 13 year old ES300 here in Dallas, I have the shades but seldom use them, interior is fine. Is it a good idea? Sure, but it sounds like you’re wanting ammo for a marital argument. Not worth it IMHO.

“But Thanks For All The Info . . .” What For? You Already Had Your Mind Set.

You asked, “Is it better to use a sun shade to protect the interior of a car or not. If you park all day in a sunny location where the temperatures reach the high 90’s does it make a difference?” People put time and thought into answering.

Then you tell us that you already had the answer you wanted before you asked, “I have a 10 year old volvo that looks new inside because I consistently use a shade–

Lastly, you are critical of the people that didn’t support you 100% by saying, “I suppose some of you don’t plan to keep your cars that long or don’t care what they look and feel like.” I do care what my cars look and feel like. I do keep them a long time. They look great even without your advice. I’ll bet I have some car care ideas you haven’t dreamed of in your life.

You’re married? I’ll bet that’s a real treat for your husband “discussing” one of your opinions. "How do I get my husband to realize he is jeopardizing the interior of our new Audi TT by not using a sun shade? " He probably stopped listening quite a while ago. I would have.

CSA

Sunshades keep the sun off the dash and upholstery, but used on the interior of the windshield, they probably don’t keep the interior any cooler. I live in a hot climate and use sunshades to protect the interior, and keep the windows down about an inch, but it still gets very hot inside the car.

BTW, sunshades actually work better on the outside of the windshield. Use the wipers to hold them in place. The problem with this is that they tend to get stolen unless you are in a very secure parking lot.