Re-attaching interior windshield pillar cover?


#1

The ‘snap’ assembly is worn and this cover will not stay put. I’m ready to glue it in place. In case someone at some time needs to remove this cover can someone suggest a glue that will hold yet not as strong as Gorilla?

Mark


#2

Any glue that will hold it in place will not let the trim piece come loose later. Also if someone does need to remove it they will expect it to be held by clips. Why not just have a body shop do it properly ?


#3

It’s a 2000 Silverado with 242,000 miles. I can’t justify the expense of a body shop…given my experience with their prices.


#4

OK then you have two options. Glue it so it stays in place or just leave it off. It is 16 years old with lots of miles so if you sell it no one should expect a pristine vehicle.


#5

Carpet tape or velcro with sticky backing may work.


#6

Hot melt glue gun applied to the factory clips. Should hold well enough but not Gorilla Glue strong.


#7

Have you checked the local boneyards for a replacement part? Have you checked the aftermarket world? It might not be as expensive as you fear.


#8

You can buy the replacement snaps and be done with it.
How does a pillar trim piece get worn out anyway?
Most of the ones I’ve seen have a plastic “tang” that snaps through a metallic clip.
If I was on a budget or loathe to spend any more money on it, I’d just remove the clip and bend the retention mechanism a bit more toward the tighter side and snap it back in…or enlarge the pin with a couple turns of electrical tape and push it home. How often are these being removed anyway?


#9

Just a couple ways to consider depending on the surfaces. I think a couple pieces of double sided foam tape would work if you can get the mating surfaces. Yeah or the velcro as suggested too if you have the hard surfaces. One thing that I used on my screw cover after they removed it for hail dent repair was a little body seam sealer putty. Also the clay type putty used to seal around wiring, vents, etc. on the outside of houses would work if you need a big chunk to fill the gap. Stays pliable, is pretty sticky but doesn’t stain, and a big bar of it is only a dollar or two at the hardware store or lumber yard.


#10

Trying the carpet tape today.


#11

The plastic tang had apparently snapped off and disappeared long ago. Trying carpet tape today.


#12

I should have thought of that before. I had good luck finding a replacement hub cab several years ago. I’ll still try the tape in the meantime, get the correct name of the part from the local part store and call the outfit I had used before.


#13

As a last resort, chrome self tapping screws with trim rings to grab the headliner. Do both sides for the industrial look. Kinda like holding a drooping headliner up with upholster screw pins.

Function over style.


#14

Carpet tape lasted for an hour or two.

No dice w/auto scrappers.

As a fallback, second best was Gorilla tape–way, way better than Duct tape.

‘Industrial’ Velcro from HD (vs. regular Velcro) has held for 2+ days and appears to be the solution.

Thanks for the suggestions,

Mark


#15

Double faced foam trim tape or the white double faced foam tape as a lesser option. Not carpet tape even though it might look the same. The black stuff is used to mount trim on the outside of cars.