Pricing an antique car that doesn't run - 65 Mustang & 73 Monte Carlo


#1

I am selling my father’s 1973 Monte Carlo and am looking for suggestions for how to price it. It’s in mint condition with less than 70k miles on the engine. Automatic. It just doesn’t run because he didn’t keep it up and running.

I am also selling his 65 Mustang. Automatic. Not sure on mileage right at this moment. It’s not running either. But the same question stands: how do I price an antique car that doesn’t run, but will with a little work, and is cosmetically in good shape?

I’m in PT school and don’t have time to get them up and running. I have an interested buyer who wants a price for both of them. But I have no idea what to tell him. Any help is appreciated.


#2

Prices on vehicles like these only come down to what you will accept and what they will pay. Even running 65 Mustangs go from low amounts to ridiculous. Look at Ebay and maybe it will give some idea.

Edit: No matter how much you sell these for someone will say you left money on the table.


#3

First, please describe in as much detail as you can the specific options on each (engine, transmission, etc.), and the condition of body, paint, and interior. Mustangs are notorious for the amount of rust they can have - is there any?

Any way you could post some photos?

I often use the ‘completed listings’ on ebay motors to get an idea of what people will pay (rather than ask) for a particular car. If you can find ones similar to your dad’s, that should give you a good idea.

But be prepared to take a major hit because they’re not running. While the fixes might be simple, there’s no way for a buyer to know that.


#4

Any idea when was the last time each one ran?


#5

Start here;

https://www.hagerty.com/valuationtools

or here;

http://www.nadaguides.com/Classic-Cars?gclid=Cj0KEQjw3ZS-BRD1xu3qw8uS2s4BEiQA2bcfM0LtZdjR96u0USiKxRDxqVfzGrFDjvx_uKn4JHNu17caAk1M8P8HAQ&s_kwcid=AL!4561!3!97587953564!e!!g!!hagerty%20price%20guide?cid=CompHagE&ef_id=U-dYjAAABbKgmxm4:20160830154450:s

Keep in mind, cars that don’t run will greatly reduce the price anyone is willing to pay because it is a huge risk to the buyer. It could cost $100 to make it run, it might cost $5000. There is no way for the buyer to know. Money spent now to get them to run will multiply the asking price.


#6

It’d be worth it to me to check with a local Mustang club for reputable mechanics, see if one would be willing to take, say, 20% of the sales price to try and get it running.


#7

The Mustang will command a higher price due to desireability. The 73-77 Monte Carlos are not terribly desireable.
My book on the Monte Carlo shows about 2-3 grand at best. I owned a '74 and the only really valuable Monte Carlos of this era are the ones with the 454 engine option.

You state “will run with a little work”. Your best option then is to get them running first. As a buyer, if the seller told me that I would assume “yeah, right” and that the engine and/or transmission is trash.

I’m NOT saying they are trash; only that is what most buyers would assume.


#8

It is hard to say. Prices vary drastically based on location, where/how you are selling, and condition.

If I was a buyer for the mustang, I would likely care about the factory options and how original the car is. The next thing is condition of the body and interior.

If you have a low mileage mustang in good condition with the “K” code 289 V8 with factor 4 speed, the car can be quite valuable. If it is a rust bucket with ratty interior and a small inline 6 it is not going to be worth as much as you might think.

Everything can be fixed but how much is the big unknown. For a car that sits for a long time, there is great risk that the engine is sized up or has weak compression from stuck rings or has a transmission issue.

If the buyer is unable to see the car run and drive, they must assume that there is engine or transmission problems.

Start with the basics. Start with the VIN #. This will help you get started. I can assure you if it is a K code in good condition, it would be worth your money to hire someone to get it running then try and sell it for top $.


#9

The Mustang has an AT, I’d bet it’s not a K code. I’m just waiting to hear if it has a 6 or a V8…