Once again, you've given your listeners B-O-O-O-G-U-S information--this time about Rain-X


#1

I heard your uninformed comment about Rain-X a few weeks ago and am just getting around to commenting on it. You basically panned the product, saying it merely smeared your windshield. If you do a simple search about this problem, you’ll find that many have had the same problem. OK, but the solution is very simple. READ THE DIRECTIONS!!!

If you do, you will see that you have to first clean and dry the windshield thoroughly. I clean it with 50/50 alcohol/water mixture and dry it with a paper towel. Now, when you apply the stuff, spray it onto a paper towel and spread it evenly until it dries a little. Do just a small section at a time. Then go over the whole windshield with a little more, trying to produce a uniform coat. This stuff is basically a polymer-based wax, similar to car wax. Once you get a nice even coat you have to buff it just like you do car wax. This is the key to avoiding the smear problem. I just use a clean dry paper towel. Keep buffing vigorously until the coat is clear and slick. No streaks. It will squeak when it is polished correctly. This does require a little bit of elbow grease but it is worth it. That’s it. Now it will repel water like you won’t believe and it won’t be smeared by the windshield wipers.

Another little trick is to use the Rain-X De-Icer instead of your usual washer fluid. It is quite reasonably priced at Walmart, etc. Every time you use it, it applies a fresh coat of Rain-X, thus prolonging the protection much longer than it would normally last before a new application is needed.

I think you guys should try this and re-evaluate the product just for your own heads if nothing else. You may be surprised.

BTW, I am not in any way affiliated with this product. I am a satisfied user only and I like to propagate ACCURATE information.


#2

I agree except that Rain-X is a very effective windshield cleaner. So I do it once to get the windshield clean, then a second time to insure a good application. But it never smears on me and it greatly increases forward visibility in the rain whether you use the wipers or not. I consider it a safety device for me.


#3

Rain-x hate the stuff, spent many hours cleaning this off windshields. It smeared, it made the almost impossible to see out the windshield when it rained and you turned on your wipers. Now to be fair, I haven’t used the stuff in years, so they might have improved it since then. But my experience with it is very bad, and yes I followed the directions.


#4

I have used rainX windshield washing fluid for a couple of years and have nothing but praise for it’s performance…especially since the cost has come down to near cheapest stuff. Does all the stuff the regular does w/o the hassle.


#5

I recommend the RainX washer fluid too. I’ve been using it for at least the last 7 years. Before that I used the traditionally applied stuff, but it really is a PITA and will smear/streak if you don’t keep up with it. By comparison, the RainX washer fluid is completely worth the extra $2/gallon compared to the blue stuff and I don’t have to bother with the whole application process. Just hit the washers.

It also does better job on light frost as it doesn’t freeze like the blue stuff and I think that with good wipers the windshield stays cleaner. By good I don’t mean the fancy $20+ ones, just the $9 Ancos/Tricos that aren’t worn out.


#6

RainX is a great product if it’s applied properly. RainX wiper blades though are probably the worst on the market. They must be made in China.


#7

I agree that the RainX is great stuff. I apply one "coat’ that usually looks smeared. Then I apply a second coat begin pretty careful on putting it on evenly. Then wait about 20 minutes while I clean up the garage and go back to wipe it down with a paper towel or even a micro-fiber towel. No issues on seeing through it.

One thing that is slightly odd is in slow traffic seems it seems to just bead up instead of moving on off the windshield. That is simple physics but is something that any new user may not be looking for.


#8

I’ve never had Rain-x smear on me. I thoroughly clean the windshield and follow the directions, and it works great, even on an old pitted windshield.


#9

Love the windshield washer stuff. Well worth the extra cost.


#10

I prefer Aquapel. Beads up and water races off. I have had last up to six months on my vehicles.


#11

I never heard of Aquapel until now. Searching around, I see it is very expensive, like ~$10 per single application. It is a totally different formulation that chemically bonds a hydrophobic compound to the glass rather than a thin film on top of the glass, like Rain-X. Interesting. Many users report 4-8 months longevity before a new application is needed. If it is true, it may be worth it. But Rain-X lasts for months too IF you use their washer fluid in conjunction with the regular product. And it is much cheaper. A single bottle is good for many applications. So I don’t know if this other product is worth the extra money. It is an interesting product though.


#12

Yep, you apply the Rain-X stuff in small circles to get even coverage, let it dry, and then - critically - buff it out! That requires some elbow grease. If you don’t buff it out well (because you’re lazy like me) it leaves smears, hence all the comments about smearing. If you didn’t buff it out enough and see smearing you can buff it out later and the smearing will be gone but the water repellant properties will remain. The product is idiot proof, just not lazy guy proof, hence the CarTalk guys’ problem :wink:


#13

RainX may not be magic, but I find it greatly improves visibility in misty conditions by causing water to bead up and run. I do it every couple years and us the wiper fluid all the time.


#14

I’m one of those lazy guys, I don’t buff it. I have found that if you apply it, then use a wet paper towel to go over it afterwards, you don’t need to buff. Its easier that way and it lasts about 2 months without using the special windshield washer fluid. I use the cheap stuff in my windshield washers.


#15

I LOVE Rain-X . My Toyota Corolla has 277k miles on it, and I’ve been through 4 new windshields over the 19 years I’ve owned the car. I’ve used Rain-X since day one, and I’ve found it to be incredibly good. The trick is to make sure the glass is clean, and apply the Rain-X as per the instructions. I also put on new Rain-X wiper blades last winter, and I’ve found them to be very good also! - Wil Davis


#16

“I’m one of those lazy guys, I don’t buff it.”

I’m one of those lazy guys too; I don’t use it.
I feel good about myself when I change oil once a year and 10,000 miles.
“I use the cheap stuff in my windshield washers.”

Me too — water. On those rare occasions when it drops below 32º here in ChiTown, I use the blue stuff from WalMart.




“My Toyota Corolla has 277k miles on it, and I’ve been through 4 new windshields over the 19 years I’ve owned the car.”

Still have your ears? You’re probably breaking too hard.
And wear a seat belt.


#17

@keith Junior Grease Monkey

OK I’ll have to try that then. Anything to not have to sweat bullets while reaching over from a step-ladder to get the middle.


#18

I hate rainx as windsheild fluid, mostly because if the windsheild has a bit of sticky pollen on it it creates more of a mess than good old cleaning fluid. At least the cleaning fluid clears the sticky film. Rain-x just sits on top of the sticky film and makes a mess.


#19

I’ve used the traditional RainX with good results, but I too discovered the washer fluid product and use that instead. One complete bottle is enough to put a pretty good coating on that gives almost as much shedding ability as the old stuff. I’ve seen it cost the same, or slightly more than the blue stuff.

The only thing I try to remember is before an oil change I either top off the tank or tell them not to fill it.


#20

@euryale1 Duct Tape Specialist
I’ve never had that problem but Rain-X also sells a bug and tar remover version of the washer fluid. In fact, it is usually the only version available in southern Arizona.