OEM vs After Market windshield for Subaru outback 2013

subaru
outback

#1

We need to replace the windshield for our Subaru outback 2013. The insurance will cover the cost for an after market, but only part of the cost for an OEM. I was wondering is it worth the extra $250 to go with the OEM in this model. I heard the importance varies from model to model and year to year. Thanks for the help!


#2

Ask yourself this?

Does Subaru make windshields?

No!

Tester


#3

I certainly don’t think so as Tester says, Subaru does not make windshields. And why the year to year would make any difference is beyond me.


#4

The original OEM windshield is made by the aftermarket; along with about 2/3 of the rest of the car.

Subaru doesn’t manufacture wire harnesses, lighting, clutches, brakes, driveshaft and CV joints, transmissions, fuel injection components, and on and on. That is SOP for all car makers.


#5

I’ve had windshield replaced in a couple Buicks a couple of times, on an Olds, and on an Acura. I’ve always just used the local shop and I’m sure they were after-market. I’ve never had any problem with any of them.


#6

I had one problem with a windshield replacement many years ago, but the last two were fine.

I seem to be lucky, at about the 5 year point when the OEM windshield gets scratchy, I have a ding or crack in the windshield from road debris, and get a new one. In my state, insurance is required to pay for the entire replacement cost.


#7

In addition to the valid comments that have already been posted, the OP should be aware that some of Consumer Reports’ evaluations of new cars have mentioned that the view through the windshield on a particular new car was distorted, and that they had it replaced, under warranty. Clearly, the windshields in those new cars were OEM, and yet some of them were defective.

So, as the other forum members have stated or implied, even the much-more-expensive OEM windshields likely come from some of the same factories that make the aftermarket glass, and yet there is a chance that they will be defective.

Several years ago, a friend of mine had to replace his windshield, after an incident with a leaping deer. His insurance company sent him to a local glass shop, where his bill was zero, so it is safe to assume that the windshield that was installed was an aftermarket one. He had no problems whatsoever with the view through that aftermarket glass.
:thinking:


#8

I think the year to year thing may be because of the self braking, adaptive cruise things. Some have cameras and sensors near the rear view mirror.


#9

Go to ANY dealer near me for a window replacement and they’ll charge you twice what this company Portland Glass charges. Then the dealer calls Portland Glass to send one of their trucks over to replace the glass for them. I don’t know any dealer these days that replaces glass.


#10

All windshields are made by outside suppliers but all suppliers are not equal. Some have a higher percentage of defective windshields than others.


#11

Following on to PvtPublic- I have read quite a few issues posted online with people having issues with “aftermarket” windshields where the technology cited is involved. Once the OEM specified glass was installed, problems went away. Yes, the dealer will go to glass supplier to get the replacement but the supplier has options available. Had several windshields replaced by JN Philips here and they offer OEM and aftermarket, the OEM being more expensive but guaranteed form, fit and function. Back in the day, didn’t matter as much as long as you could see through it and it didn’t crack. That is changing…