Need Replacement for VW Golf TDI/Diesel

diesel
golf

#1

I love my 1999 VW Golf TDI. With 120,000 miles on it, however, I’m keeping my eyes out for a replacement. Does anyone know if VW or Honda is planning to come out with a diesel wagon or hatchback? A sedan doesn’t quite cut it for me since I have kid’s stuff and dogs to transport.


#2

Hang onto it. Why are you replacing it?

Honda is slated in a few years (2010) possibly for their SUV’s and minivans. VW is wishy washy on introducing a diesel till the US gets their fuel standards(cleaner) worked out. Another maker considering it is Subaru.


#3

I would also hold on to it for a while. Is there some reason you need to replace it? The new VW diesels should be available in 2008, I would expect high prices and long waits. A friend of mine is already trying to get one reserved (he’s owned two previous TDIs, and he just likes owning new cars). I have no idea what the ricers will be offering.


#4

If I’m not mistaken, Volkswagen will have a Passat diesel station wagon out shortly. This would be an ideal vehicle for you, although a bit more expensive to buy. The Passat is even recommended by Consumer Reports because of its better reliability record than the other VWs. I recently saw an ad for a Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel (Mercedes V6)that claimed 31mpg highway. Although this has more room, it is a heavy machine, designed mostly for self concious SUV addicts. If you want maximum space at reasonable cost, the Scion D or Honda Element offer the most with good gas mileage.

Also, Chrysler has been building diesel minivans in Europe for a number of years now. Expect them to introduce one with the Mercedes diesel shortly. We are defintitely going to $4.00/gallon gas over the years you will own your new vehicle.

Both Honda and Toyota will bring out diesels in the future. If you want to wait a a while, there will be lots of choice. And Nissan with its Renault connection will soon have a diesel out as well. Now that we can buy low sulfur diesel nation-wide, the manufacturers are jumping on the band wagon.


#5

Don’t hold your breath. There is a lot going on backstage…In the near future, there won’t be enough diesel/fuel oil/jet fuel to go around. Todays politically powerful fuel oil consumers, (trucking, construction, farmers, airlines, railroads) do NOT want to compete with private vehicle owners for dwindling fuel supplies. Our refineries have been optimized to produce gasoline and that market will be protected. Expect only a token number of high-priced diesels in the consumer market…


#6

Both Honda and Toyota will bring out diesels in the future. If you want to wait a a while, there will be lots of choice. And Nissan with its Renault connection will soon have a diesel out as well. Now that we can buy low sulfur diesel nation-wide, the manufacturers are jumping on the band wagon.

Actually Nissan and Toyota already have Diesels out…just not in the US.


#7

Agree. I meant in North America. A few years ago I was in Asia and rode in an old Toyota Corolla taxi with a diesel. This little machine had 1,400,000 kilometers (873,900 miles) on it and the engine was all original, according to the owner/driver. The upholstery was an other matter, it looked like a colony of rats had spent a few months in the car. Yes, most foreign manufacturers have had diesels for a number of years. Nissan has an excellent straight six diesel which has as little vibration as a gas engine.


#8

They need to save the fuel to keep all those black helicopters going, I suppose. (-;


#9

With 120,000 miles its barely broken in! My 99 Golf is just shy 285,000 miles
and has had NO engine repairs. Tomorrow I leave for vacation and expect to put on another 1,000. If you use a high quality synthetic oil like Mobil Delvac 1 you’ll likely have the same results. Sell it and someone else is going to have a 'new’car.


#10

And when the helicopters are topped off, fill up that C5-A over there. Forget the VW diesels, they come LAST…


#11

Yes, keep your diesel; it’s not done yet. When it is, I would be wary of buying another diesel. Good, fully developed, entirely mechanical diesel car engines could be more economical to drive than a gasoline engine counterpart. Now diesels are complicated with electronics, emission controls and expensive maintenance such as special engine oils and frequent $25 fuel filter changes and are going to get worse in that regard, not to mention higher purchase prices and the expensive rubber cam belt drive of a VW and possibly other brands on the way. When your diesel is done, consider a gasoline car unless you want the unique character of a diesel, no matter the drawbacks. You may already be somewhat accustomed to a non-mechanical diesel or maybe not as you are talking about getting rid of it?


#12

I really hope you are joking.


#13

He currently has a '99, not exactly a “mechanical diesel.” Now, my 82 is really mechanical.


#14

He said it was a TDI. There are some conversions out there both TDI to mechanical and mechanical to TDI.