Gas kicking back when filling tank

camry

#1

98 CAMRY 3.0 V6 GAS KICKING BACK WHEN FILLING TANK.WAS TOLD ITS AN EASY FIX.THAT A LINE THAT MAKES THE AIR ESCAPE IS CLOGGED.BUT I CANT SEEM TO FIND THE CANISTER OR WHERE THE LINE IS PLEASE HELP.IF I PUMP IT REALLY SLOW IT WILL GO IN STEADY.


#2

The line that allows the air to escape as you fill the tank goes through a float valve to shut the nozzle down when the tank is full and through a charcoal bed in the canister (I believe in a '98 Camry it’s under the car, but the dealer’s part guy can print you an exploded view diagram of its location). If the charcoal gets saturated, which can happen from “topping off” the tank, it can prevent sufficient air passage and cause the symptom you describe. The canister would need replacement.

Ask nicely and he might even print a protocol to test the system.

Get the aforementioned “exploded view” drawing from the dealer. With that you can check the lines… and find the charcoal canister.
And if you’ve been “topping off” the tank, I recommend you discontinue the practice.


#3

All late model cars that I have removed the tank from used a 3/4" +/- rubber hose inside the rubber tank filler hose to vent the tank when filling. If that vent hose slipped downward it would cause the filler nozzle to trip off and spit back when fuel reached the level of the lower end of the vent hose. If that vent hose became kinked it would require that the tank be filled very slowly even when nearly empty. Has the fuel pump been recently replaced? If so the filler neck was reconnected without properly locating the vent hose.


#4

Here’s a diagram of a typical onboard vapor recovery system with a brief description of how it works during refueling.


#5

If you like to “top off”, you may have flooded the charcoal canister. Expensive fix. Ask me how I know.


#6

The charcoal canister is probably near the engine air filter, intake boot area. If you can find it, no harm done to look for something broken, missing, or a part that has fallen off. I don’t think that’s the problem though. In OBD II cars like yours the evap is a complicated system involving various vacuum and electric operated valves. Not a diy job unless you have access to the manufacturer’s description of how it works and the recommended diagnostic and repair procedures. You might want to take a look at this thread prior posted here for some background info.

http://community.cartalk.com/discussion/2306713/evap-during-re-fueling-on-early-90s-corolla/p1