Filter issues


#1

Well took my 2003 impala LS back to good year to see if they could remove the oil drain plug since another place couldn’t due to it being on to tight. Goodyear apologized and was finally able to get it off. They changed the oil and did a full check. They stated the fuel filter needed replacement. In all the years I have owned a car I have never had that replaced.

To replace it they want $60 for part and labor. My question is how often should the fuel filter be replaced and what is a fair cost to have it done?

My car us at 114000 miles, I purchased it last year when it had a little over 103,000 miles in it. No clue if it’s the original fuel filter or what.


#2

Goodyear, like most chain stores, always tries to upsell you parts you don’t need. Ask them how they know it needs replacement. My understanding is that you can tell only by removal and inspection (assuming there are no engine symptoms).

But that being said, check your owner’s manual for replacement intervals. My car, for example, says change it every 70k miles. It may well still have the original filter.

Edit: at $60, I’d do it.

But


#3

I would say that at that mileage, any fuel filter should be replaced. If it has never been done. It can be time consuming or dead easy depending on the car, so I know nothing here.


#4

Where is the fuel filter located in the car? If it’s outside the tank then it surely needs replacing…you’re long past due. If it’s inside the tank…then it uses a back flush system that in theory should never need replacing. My 05 4runner has this type of system…and after 275k miles it’s never been replaced and never had an issue. I still prefer a system where the filter is outside the tank and you replace it.


#5

At a quoted cost of $60, it would have to be outside. Or Goodyear is confused…


#6

$60 parts and labor to replace a fuel filter

Sounds very fair to me . . . go for it

If you don’t know when it was done last, it’s overdue


#7

Just looked it up at rockauto , they have several listed starting at $1.29 on up to $11.41 . It certainly appears to be a simple in-line filter . I think I’d pick one up at a parts store for a few dollars & install it myself .


#8

Fine, but $60 parts and labor is very fair, possibly even on the low side

I suspect none of my fellow pros on this website is going to disagree with me . . . ? :neutral:


#9

Even though the filter in question is not the one inside the tank access can still be difficult. It also requires a special quick disconnect tool which most people don’t have. At $60 I’d go for it.


#10

Anyone that wants to pay someone $60.00 for maybe 10 minutes work & a $5.00 filter has my blessing . Those special tools cost $11.00 for a set that fits several line sizes & lasts a lifetime . I recently bought a set . Of course for a person that can’t change their own oil or put air in their tires $60.00 might be a good deal . JMO


#11

$60 is a little on the low side for a shop to charge. I think the estimate is quite fair.

I would have recommended the fuel filter as part of the 100,000 mile service and tune-up.


#12
Anyone that wants to pay someone $60.00 for maybe 10 minutes work & a $5.00 filter has my blessing .

I’ve owned and worked on several vehicles that had in-line filters that took a lot longer then 10 minutes to replace.


#13

It’s more than ten minutes work. It’s located at the gas tank, often with obstructions such as the rear axle, or even the charcoal canister on some models. You often can’t get sufficient swing on the wrenches on the threaded fitting end. Also, since it’s apparently never been changed the fittings may be siezed with rust. Been there - done that. Having the car on a lift makes it a lot easier.


#14

It would take more than 10 minutes for most people to lift the vehicle. There is also the potential for needing to have the vehicle towed to a shop because of a broken fuel line connector.

Also the safety issues of working with gasoline.


#15

@Sloepoke

“10 minutes work & a $5.00 filter”

Sorry, Charlie, but you’re on your own with that one . . .

Walk over to the parts counter, or pull your own parts . . . whatever
Charge out the parts
Unpack the filter, throw the plastic in the trash, throw the cardboard in the blue container
We do recycle, you know
Remove parts as needed, to access the filter
Replace the filter
Button everything back up
start the car and look for leaks
let the car down off the hoist
wash up
write up the repair order in the computer
turn in the ticket
park the car

10 minutes . . . in theory only

$5 filter . . . no offense, but that doesn’t sound like very high quality to me, even if you’re getting a bulk discount

And even if the shop paid $5 for the filter, there will be a fair markup. Shops are entitled to a fair profit. And overhead needs to be accounted for


#16

I just paid { as chance would have it } $60.00 to have 4 old tires removed from my truck & 4 new ones mounted & balanced with new valve stems & reinstalled on the truck . The guy even had a high dollar spin balance machine & used a torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts . I didn’t buy the new tires from him either .
Not too long ago I watched a show on either DIY or maybe HG TV where a lady called a plumber for a dripping outdoor faucet . The faucet was nothing more than a $7.00 boiler drain screwed into a pipe sticking out her basement wall . The plumber was there no more than 10 or 15 minutes & charged her $300.00 & some dollars . To top it off she gave him a $25.00 tip . I couldn’t sleep at night after doing someone that way .


#17

@db4690 , dang , how long does it take you to do an oil change , half a day or a full day ?


#18
Not too long ago I watched a show on either DIY or maybe HG TV where a lady called a plumber for a dripping outdoor faucet . The faucet was nothing more than a $7.00 boiler drain screwed into a pipe sticking out her basement wall . The plumber was there no more than 10 or 15 minutes & charged her $300.00 & some dollars .

Most companies have a MINIMUM price for service calls. How long did it take the driver to get there? Plus I’m sure he works for some corporation…then there’s overhead and paperwork. I do think that the $300 is pretty steep…but no less then $100. Many companies also charge by HOURS. If it takes one minute…it’s still an hour in labor.


#19

@Sloepoke - You might want to hold off your comments until you’ve replaced the filter. Let us know how it goes.


#20

I’m curious about something with regards to fuel filters. Are there diagnostics on normal cars that would indicate a need for a replacement? Where I work, a regular measurement like flow, pressure, or differential pressure would dictate many of our filter replacements, especially those that are expensive or time-consuming. Is there any such system on regular vehicles?

I was just wondering how anyone could determine a new fuel filter was “needed” other than looking at the mileage, which wouldn’t particularly accurate in assessing the filter’s condition.