Explorer clutch


#1

I have a well maintained and very good running '93 explorer. For the third time in 15 years I have replaced the clutch. Third clutch was put in only after taking a long trip and returning home with a cracked flywheel noise. Replaced the clutch and resurfaced the flywheel. The noise is much better now, and I have to top off the clutch master cylinder every other day. Wouldn’t the machine shop check for cracks in the flywheel before resurfacing, and can I replace the hydraulic line and solve the leak without having to replace the slave cylinder?


#2

Yes, the machine shop would. Nobody is going to turn a cracked flywheel. But the “cracked flywheel noise” may have been just from scoring of the flywheel from disappearing clutchplate friction pads. I’m glad to hear it’s better now.

If the hydraulic line or its fitting is where the leak is, then yes that would fix it. If the leak is around the seal of the piston shaft on the master or slave cylinder, then replacing the line won’t fix it.

By the way, if either cylinder is due for replacement, and after 15 years one probably is, you’re better off to just go ahead and change them both. The other is likely at the end of its life too.


#3

No, you don’t understand. The flywheel noise is louder!


#4

Your post is mis-leading. You said the sound was better, meaning not as bad. No machine shop would dare turn a cracked flywheel. What is the sound like? How are you determining a cracked flywheel noise? Did you replace the pilot bushing and throwout bearing? Are you sure the noise is not in the transmission?

Also, the clutch fluid is coming from a leak either in the master cylinder or slave cylinder. After 15 years, do yourself a favor a replace both. Does this truck have an external slave cylinder, or a hydraulic throwout bearing? If it is a hydraulic throwout bearing, at least you’ll have the opportunity to check the flywheel for cracks. The transmission will have to come out again if the leak is not in the master cylinder.