Can I use Liquid Nails to fix a hole in my exhaust?

ford
explorersport

#1

I have a finger sized hole that need patch work. I used the putty method but it cracked and broke off due to driving. My concerns are, if I use Liquid Nails, will it hold and will the temperature of my exhaust stand without a potential heat/fire hazard?


#2

You’d be better off using a pair of large hose clamps (or two or three pairs connected to each other) and a crushed soda can or a piece of sheet metal, but chances are, if you’re having a rust problem now, this is just a stopgap measure, and you’re going to need a new exhaust anyway.


#3

No no no! I was taught early on by the head mechanic at my first job to never use a soda can on your exhaust.

You need a soup can for that.


#4

Agree with asemaster use to oil cans but being that oil comes in plastic now I think. a soup can is the next best


#5

Geeze just fix it. Pop cans are thin aluminum with a low melting point, soup cans are steel but a lot of them have ridges for strength so you need a smooth one. Still going to leak though no matter what.


#6

Just fix it properly!!!


#7

Of course, the hose clamps might collapse the exhaust pipe if it is too rusty.


#8

Over the years I’ve used both aluminum cans with clamps and exhaust repair kits from the parts store. Both are good temporary fixes, but only that.


#9

both Advance Auto Parts and AutoZone where I live have a set of high-temp putty and some thick fabric specifically designed for the job, price is something like $10


#10

My experience with the tape and putty is that it just burns out pretty quickly, depending on where the patch is on the pipe.


#11

spend 17 bucks and get one of these repair clamps. It will outlast the rest of the tailpipe.


#12

You can use the tape and putty kits on a tail pipe but not on an exhaust pipe. Still a very temporary fix.


#13

If you use Bean Soup , do you get the beans sound effect ? :wink:


#14

I fixed a Y pipe with a muffler patch kit that was like plaster with a fiberglass bandage. It worked for a long time. They make plastic type patch kits. Maybe not any more.


#15

Where’s the leak located? If it’s a pipe going right up to the CATs, you can use a 4"x 6" aluminum flashing sheet from Home Depot and a couple of spring loaded hose clamps you can buy online. It’s worked well for a hole I have that I need to get fixed. The spring loaded ones will help with the expansion and contraction of the pipe from heating up and cooling down.


#16

Sure. You can also use chewing gum, plumbers putty, or Elmers glue. Just don’t expect it to last much further than the end of your driveway.


#17

Especially if the cause of the hole is rust… rust never sleeps, and it’s never isolated to the hole. :grin:


#18

I once pop riveted a beer can over a rusted muffler to keep a truck on the road for a while and the patch failed to fully seal the leak and in a few days several rivets had popped out making the effort a total waste. It’s worthwhile to use an ice pick to check the bottoms of mufflers during scheduled servicing to anticipate and avoid future problems.


#19

I’ve used a pop can in an emergency, but of you have some flashing handy that should be even better. Any patch is only a temporary fix anyway.


#20

JB Weld???