Blinker and headlight problem 2002 Saturn lw200 wagon


#1

So whenever I turn my left signal on my headlights will turn on, typically my high beams since I have auto daylights. This happens usually 90% of the time. Then I started noticing that my headlights will not turn off sometimes. I have to play with it a few times by turning the automatic light function on/off as well as the hi/lo beams. Sometimes if I get it to shut off it will flicker back on until I do it a few more times. Any idea what is wrong?


#2

I would guess the multi function switch. It controls both the headlights and the turn signals.


#3

Combination Switch?
How Many Miles On This Saturn?
CSA


#4

This is another vote for the multi-function switch. BTW…this is not a DIY project as the airbag system is involved when you start working in the area to remove the switch.


#5

“This is another vote for the multi-function switch. BTW…this is not a DIY project as the airbag system is involved when you start working in the area to remove the switch.”

That’s what I thought…

This may or may not be the case. My GM Chevrolet Factory Service Manual, specific to our 01 Impala, said to disconnect the battery, remove the air-bag, steering wheel…

This was not necessary. I removed one at salvage yard and installed it at home, without removing the air-bag or steering wheel! The secret was a 1/4" ratchet and correct torx bit that could approach the attaching screws that are behind the steering wheel, on a 90 degree angle. Coming at them straight-on would have required removing all that stuff. It didn’t take all that long to do it.

It’s been a couple of years now, but the lights are still working great on the old Impala!

CSA


#6

CSA…I always state this disclaimer whenever I mention the multi-function switch because I don’t know the specific mechanical expertise of people who may want to do this replacement as a DIY. Good tip BTW for those that know what they are doing. I’ve seen individuals trying to do this job without disconnecting the battery…believe it or not.


#7

+1 to missileman’s posts, including his warning. Someone with good mechanical aptitude and the foresight to check out the installation ahead of time may be able to do a job like this safely, but should someone with not quite enough aptitude try this one they could get seriously injured.

One approach is to get a good repair manual… again, assuming some aptitude. Much as I could not paint a masterpiece even with the best of guidance, there are those who could not perform even the most basic mechanical procedures even with a good manual. Everyone has innate aptitudes, and everyone has innate weaknesses.


#8

Even Though I Disconnect The Battery When Working Near The Air-Bag, I still Feel Like I Should Don At Least A Bike Helmet!

Working near the radiator support requires some care, too, as that’s where an air-bag sensor hangs out.

Police in my local town would provide free “lock-out” service to people (like my wife, for instance, a regular customer) who locked their keys inside their vehicles. They used Slim-Jims inserted into the driver’s door and fished for lock rods, etcetra.

They got out of that routine when many cars began being manufactured with side air-bags!

CSA