74-80 corvette


#1

I’m pushing to big five-o and have always wanted a vette. I’m finally in a situation where I can have one and not have the wee little ones jumping in it a tossing fries down between the seats. I’ve never owned one. What issues would be important when looking into buying one. I’m undecided between 1974 thru 1980 models.


#2

Wait A Minute, Viking Jim! Mrs. Viking Doesn’t Want You Renting A Car For $150!

You’d better clear this with her first or we’re just wasting time (or is this just one of those mid-life dream things?).


#3

Shhhh. It’s a mind game with her. I’ll give in and tell her she’s right about the rental car bit. She’ll feel proud & worthy…then wammo. “Honey look what I bought US”


#4

Great Plan, Viking Jim! That Is Really Well Thought Out. Good Luck!
You do realize that Mrs. Viking will come home with a substantial purchase and use that same line, right?


#5

??
Dear CSA.
Do you have any thoughts/comments on my thread ?


#6

Given how bad pollution controls and engines were in the early-mid 70s, I’d get as new a one as possible (I’d go for the next gen, 83+, but that’s me). Here’s a buyer’s guide to Vettes that might give you some info: http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Downs/3000/guide2.html


#7

thanks tex.


#8

Viking Jim, Only That I Have That Same Idea About Picking Up A Vette From About The Same Era For About The Same Reason And I’m Interested In The Replies!


#9

This was not a good period for the US auto industry. Be prepared to work on it. Frequently.

As with any older car, buy one that someone else has already spent money fixing up. It’s much less expensive to pay a bit more up front and have a decent car than to buy a cheap one and dump a lot of money into it.


#10

Good points - you will never get your money back on an extensive restoration, so getting a good one is important. This should be a great time to buy, they’re fairly common, and lots of folks are needing cash ASAP.