2009 Toyota Matrix digital odometer does NOT display all digits


#1

The odometer only displays partial pieces of the digital numbers. Can this be fixed? If so, how would you go about it? Thanks.


#2

Usually when displays on a digital instrument cluster fail, the instrument cluster is replaced.

If it were me, I’d live with it if it’s just the odometer display.

Tester


#3

Tester: Yeah, I agree…if I was keeping it I would just live with it, but need to sell it. Thanks.


#4

Sometimes the problem comes from bad contacts between the cables powering the instrument cluster and the cluster itself. If you are a home mechanic you could try removing the cluster and reconnecting the cables after a cleaning.


#5

This vehicle uses LCD (Light Changing Diodes) controlled to comprise the elements of numbers. Each element basically changes the way it transmits light when its polarity is changed. The LCD module is not repairable, much like a computer chip, and requires replacement when an element fails. The instrument cluster containing the odometer isn’t designed to be repairable either, and even if you could get a new LCD display (highly unlikely, as experience has taught me that this level of Bill of Materials will likely be unavailable from Toyota) I seriously doubt if you could nondestructively access it.

I once tried to build a wiring harness to install driving lights on my Scion. I retrieved the wiring diagrams, the schematics, even the part number for the connector to plug it in. I have electronics training and experience as well as soldering training and experience at a high level. What I discovered was that all of the parts I’d need, including the connector, are all proprietary designs unavailable to the public. I even tried searching the databases of connector manufacturers to no avail. I ended up just buying the harnesses, relay, and switch from Toyota.


#6

@mountainbike LCD= Liquid Crystal Display. Agree, when something goes wrong it’s disposal. I’ve had several watches that died that way.


#7

@Brett55
"Sometimes the problem comes from bad contacts between the cables powering the instrument cluster and the cluster itself. If you are a home mechanic you could try removing the cluster and reconnecting the cables after a cleaning."

Try This At Home:
I Know What I Would Try. I Would Open My Hand And Hit The Top Of The Dashboard, Above The Instruments) A Couple Of Times With My Palm. This could fix it, fix it temporarily, or do nothing.

Don’t Try This At Home:
I’m sure people will advise not to try this and say this can damage something else, but I’ve never had that experience when I’ve tried it. I have had it fix gauge problems. It possibly could let you find out if you’ve got an intermittent connection.

I go for the easiest, cheapest repairs, first. If it does damage something, don’t try it. :neutral:
CSA


#8

Yup, also called more technically Liquid Crystal Displays. :smile:
I never got onto digital watches. Always preferred analog. I always felt there was sort of a time-space relationship between the positions of the hands and the time.


#9

Recalling my first LCD watch, circa 1975 or so. I think it cost about $75, which was sort of expensive for a watch back then, but within reason. Same thing now would cost just a few dollars. The funny part of the story is that my co-worker told me “George, that watch’s display will go blank within 2 years, LCD’s are known to fail very quickly.” At some point the band broke, so I relegated the watch to my home lab use as a timepiece, since it has stop-watch function. Despite what my coworker said, 40 years later, it’s still working fine … lol .


#10

And I’ll bet it keeps better time than a Rolex. Not as beautiful though.