2000 Ford Taurus V6 24 Valve

#1

The serpentine belt recently broke and was replaced. The a/c compressor is loud. When the s belt was off, the compressor was making a grinding noise when the pulley was manually turned.



The cost to replace is $800. Any other suggestions? How long do you think we can drive the car this way?

#2

For some engines, you can get a by-pass pulley and bracket to replace the A/C compressor position, and be able to use the original drive belt. Ask your auto parts store.
You can survive without A/C until warm weather, and a fuller wallet, arrive, can’t you?

#3

Possible that the extra load from the “grinding compressor” could shorten belt life.

Are you planning on trying to avoid replacing the entire compressor? (possible the noise is for now just compressor clutch related,continued use could turn this into a complete compressor issue,is the $800.00 figure for a complete compressor?)

If you loose the compressor pulley (which is involved in belt routing) you are dead in the water.

Perhaps there is a belt and routing procedure for cars without AC.

#4

Survive is the operative word…the use of air in winter driving to defog the inside of the car is important enough that I wouldn’t put it off.

#5

"Possible that the extra load from the “grinding compressor” could shorten belt life. "
Especially if it seizes, then the belt will shred itself.

#6

I can surely live without the air but the car is very loud. Does anyone know for sure if there is some type of bypass for this.

#7

I would be certain that the noise is indeed the compressor and not the bearing on the compresssor clutch. You should be able to pull a connector loose on the compressor clutch. If the noise continues, the problem is in the bearing of the compressor clutch. The clutch can be separated from the compressor and replaced without replacing the entire compressor. A good air conditioning shop should be able to handle this. If the noise goes away, the problem is in the compressor. You may want to leave the compressor clutch disconnected until you are ready to repair the system.

I would bet on the compressor clutch as the problem. I had this problem come up on my 1978 Oldsmobile Cutlass. One shop said I needed a new compressor. I disconnected the compressor clutch and the noise continued. I found a shop that would jus replace the clutch. That was at least 20 years ago and I am still driving the car with the original compressor.

#8

Your first paragraph says “I would be certain that the noise is indeed the compressor and not the compressor clutch”

Your second paragraph says “I would bet on the compressor clutch as the problem”

Is this a simple punctuation error?

#9

Where is the compressor clutch? Is it within the compressor? Would the compressor need to be removed from the engine to do this? This is where I’m told my biggest expense is, within the labor to do this. The radiator needs to be removed - just to access the A/C compressor. Thank you!

#10

It is at the very front of the compressor,the belt wraps around one component of the compressor clutch group (I consider the pulley part of the clutch group)

#11

The a/c compressor with clutch: http://www.autozone.com/shopping/repairGuide.htm?method=relatedParts&partTypeCode=82

#12

Thanks. I’m not a mechanic (although, I was quite proud of myself for replacing the broken serpentine belt!) … is this something that a non-mechanic type of person can do, or are special tools, etc. needed?

#13

You are correct. The first two sentences of the first paragraph should have been:

“You should be cerain that the noise is indeed the compressor and not the compressor clutch. I would bet on the compressor clutch as the problem”. Then eliminate this second sentence from the second paragraph.

I should have proof-read my response before I posted. (My late mother was an English teacher. She would have been very upset with my post. Thank you for pointing out the problem.)