What should I do to make my car faster even thought I use it for daily driving

hyundai
tiburon

#1

I have a Hyundai Tiburon 2003 GT V6 6 speed manuel and I just paid it off. I know its not the best car to hook up but the car is fully hooked up on the out side. The car looks really fast but it isn’t. I don’t want to spend $15,000 to hook up the engine so I was looking online for a T3/T4 25-35 PSI 450 max HP Turbo, GodSpeed Intercooler, Custom Piping, and a HKS Boost controller. I found all of that for a total of $900 without installation. I don’t know if my engine for my car can take force induction with no modification. Do you know if the engine needs the modification? Also should I use anything different? and what else should I do to the car to make sure that the engine won’t get messed up with the new turbo? Your answer would be greatly appreciated, thanks


#2

Your engine/transmission/drivetrain will not handle 450 hp and 25-35 psi boost. Have you looked for any Hyundai forums? There may be some Tiburon drivers who’ve had success while keeping their engines from breaking.


#3

Anytime you add a forced air induction system be it either with a turbo or supercharger, this adds extra air into the engine. To compensate for the extra air, extra fuel has to be added. So either larger injectors need to be installed, or the computer reprogrammed to add the extra fuel. That’s just for starters.

Tester


#4

I agree with Texases on both of his points. Additionally, there are now magazines that specialize in performance-modifying “riceburners”, otherwise commonly called “tuners”. You might enjoy a stop at the bookstore.


#5

I’m Not Sure What A Hyundai Tiburon 2003 GT V6 Is (They’re Are No Hyundais Around Here), But I Don’t Think It’s A Race Car Or Even A Sports Car.

I’m not even sure what " fully hooked up on the out side." is, but fast it’s not !

Before you try turning it into one ( It would be like putting perfume on a pig), why not sell it and get a car that will meet your expectations and desires ?

I think it’s the right car for the wrong driver or wrong car for the right driver. Since it’s hooked up outside, off it !

CSA


#6

Yes, you can do this!

First, you need to install a heavy-duty crankshaft, new beefed-up main bearing caps, forged heavy-duty connecting rods, a higher capacity oil pan, a different camshaft, larger injectors, and new cylinder heads to reduce the compression ratio. Don’t forget to install a new radiator with a higher capacity, as well as an additional cooling fan. You may also need new pistons. All of this is necessitated by the turbocharger.

The clutch will have to be swapped for a heavy-duty model with much stronger clutch springs, and the transmission will have to be replaced with one that can stand up to the torque of the modified engine.

Then, you will need to install much more powerful brakes. I recommend Brembo rotors and calipers. Larger tires on stronger alloy wheels will also be necessary.

The suspension will also need to be modified, as a result of the higher cornering speeds that you will likely be subjecting the car to.

You should be able to do all of this for…around $25,000 or so, as long as you can find a cheap mechanic.

Or, you could simply buy a car that is already set up properly by the manufacturer.
If you buy a new car that is purpose-built by the manufacturer, it will be more durable, more reliable, and will come with a warranty. Of course, it won’t have all of the “boy-racer” plastic parts from Wal-Mart, but you could always add them. Wal-mart also sells many types of hooks, in case you want the new car to be “hooked up”.


#7

25-35 pounds of boost on a gas engine? Good luck with that. Start thinking around 12-14 psi, if you rebuild the the engine with forged internals. Of course this is FWD car as well. I hope you like torque steer.

I’d consider trading it in on a Genesis Coupe, the 2.0L turbo model, it’s engine is quite similar to the one in the Evo X, though it’s not quite as robustly built.


#8

I’d go with the sedan before the coupe. Lot more comfortable to sit in


#9

I am definitely not into the whole “tuner” thing, since it is a lot cheaper and easier to get power out of a V8. Frankly, $15,000 probably wouldn’t get you 450 horsepower out of your engine. Adding a turbo, even a mild one, to this engine would most likely require other engine modifications, particularly to lower the compression ratio. If you want to go a little faster for around $900, you might consider nitrous oxide. It is fairly engine friendly, cheap, can be done without further modifications (within reason!), and should give you another 50 horsepower. That is probably your best bet for the money you have to spend, and your desire to keep it a daily driver. It is also a status symbol amongst the tuner crowd. You can say to the other rice burner people, “my car has NAAAAHHHSSS!!!”

25 to 35 PSI of boost??? Good grief! Even with a block and heads full of concrete, that would still probably blow the heads clean off the engine. It might go really fast for a couple seconds, but then it would be over.


#10

I don’t think the OP is really concerned with comfort. The Genesis coupe is a different animal compared to the Genesis sedan.


#11

I will answer by saying at one time I had rather questionable ideas about how to make horsepower and go fast, I attritbute it to youthful ideas. It has been pointed out many times that forecd induction will shorten your engines life and that $900.00 is really just the tip of the iceberg. One thing that will happen is you will get tired not having your “hooked up on the outside” car too drive and you will be tempeted to take shortcuts to get the engines mods done.


#12

I love it when everyone goes immediately to EXTREME/MAX/ULTIMATE. Put a turbo on it and start off with 5psi of common and tolerable boost. It may satisfy your need for speed. It won’t tax the internals to the point of needing beefing up, it will just shorten their life span a bit from the potential 300k down to the point where you’ll get tired of it anyway.


#13

I think you are headed in the wrong direction. Instead of adding stuff to improve the power to weight ratio, I think you should remove stuff to improve the power to weight ratio.

I would start by removing all of the seats, and replacing the driver’s seat with a light weight racing seat. Then I would remove the spare tire and jack. If yours has one of those ridiculous decorative spoilers that have no real purpose, lose it. Then I would take out all of the interior body panels, including the one on the ceiling. After that, I would consider removing the air conditioning system and the passenger airbag, and maybe the sun roof.

After you shed as much weight as you can, if you still don’t think your car is fast enough, then it will be time to consider modifications, but not on the engine. Some light weight racing rims and light weight racing suspension upgrades should help.

If you do manage to make your car faster, make sure you also upgrade the brakes. The brake upgrade will add weight, but you will need the additional stopping power.


#14

BUT… It’s still a Hyundai!!!


#15

If you actually want to go fast on a budget, your best bet will be to sell this car and get a Mustang GT. They’re pretty fast stock and have a tremendous following in the aftermarket (lots of go-fast goodies available), plus their engines are already pretty beefy and will take around 500 horsepower before needing bottom end upgrades. Add slicks and you will probably be in the high tens in the quarter mile with no major engine work. It may not be a rice burner or look like something from the movie “The Fast and The Furious,” but it is probably your best bet for going fast on a budget.

If that’s not budget friendly enough, do what I do and buy an old Chevy truck and build that. I have one right now I have around $1000 into, including purchase price and tax/tags. It’s not fast enough for my tastes right now, so I’m going to build a new 350 Chevy motor to put into it. They are cheap and plentiful. For another $1000, I will have around 350-400 horsepower, which is enough to be a lot of fun, towing and hauling capabilities, a spare engine in the garage just in case, and a very replaceable vehicle I don’t have to worry too much about. The powertrain will go into a host of other vehicles if something happens to the truck. Added bonus: cheap car insurance. That’s how I satisfy my need for speed, but our tastes are probably quite different.


#16

Buy an Infiniti G37 coupe


#17

And when the day is over it’s still just a Hyundai. Like a friend of mine always says. You can make a trash can pretty as a picture with paint and designs and such, but all you still have is a trash can.


#18

Your engine will need extensive modifications to withstand 35 psi of boost, starting with lower compression pistons and most likely heavy duty parts everywhere.

Hot rodding is not a poor man’s hobby.

A fast car will not make you more famous or popular.

You’ll still be late for work.

You won’t get the money you sunk into the car back when you sell it, you may even lower its resale value.