Volvo City Safety System gets thumbs up from NHTSA, IIHS


#1


Volvo just got a major thumbs up in the safety department. Both the National Highway Traffic Safety Institute and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have stated that the automaker’s City Safety technology helps reduce, and even prevent, low-speed collisions. In fact, the IIHS noted that users of City Safety wind up filing nearly 30 percent less at-fault claims.

The system, which is available on the Volvo XC60, works by monitoring traffic in front of the vehicle. When driving at a speed of between two and 19 miles per hour, the car can apply the brakes should forward traffic suddenly do the same. When the difference in speed between your car and one in front of you is nine mph or less, the Volvo will brake quickly enough to avoid an accident. Above that threshold and you’re most likely going into the car in front of you but the damage will be greatly reduced compared to an accident involving cars not utilizing the City Safety System.

We tried it out for ourselves a while back, and our own Dan Roth escaped without putting a dent into his bosses BMW. Check that clip out for yourself after the jump, and be sure to read the full press releases while you’re down there.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXh6RvMmIvE

More nannyware for those too stupid to drive, but continue to do so.

Also, if I’m annoying anyone with these constant AB posts, lemme know. I just figured it’d be nice to see something car related, but not reporting any actual car problems


#2

I’m good with them. You tend to post the most interesting of them, and it saves me a lot of time searching through the dross. :slight_smile:

Chase


#3

Keep up the good work, bscar.


#4

I find these posts interesting.

These systems have shown up on other cars, Mercedes comes to mind. I think it’s a good system, but would not support mandating it. By doing so we’d end up paying for a system in our new cars because some other idiots won’t pay attention to their driving.


#5

I agree that it should stay as an option. Insurance companies might offer a discount for this option if they find that they have fewer accidents on cars with it. That will take a while to sort out, though.


#6

Better than their first go at it

http://www.youtube.com/embed/MXI0ByfEdR8"


#7

oops


#8

Whether we like it or not, I can see a system in use in the next … years that will control your speed to avoid accidents. I see it integrated with a driverless system that allows your car to travel a preprogramed route on a busy highway. You’ll be able to send the kids alone in the family car to grandmother’s house while you go to work. We have throttle by wire now, why not braking and steering next ? Then, driving a car can be out of our “hands”.


#9

20 years is my prediction. they’re already trying out the driverless cars now. Give them that long to work out all the kinks in the system and make it affordable for the masses


#10

20 years is my prediction. they’re already trying out the driverless cars now. Give them that long to work out all the kinks in the system and make it affordable for the masses

They’ve been working on that technology for 20 years…They may get it to work…but it’s going to be a while…


#11

Wonder if the system senses stuff like motorcycles, bicycles, pedestrians, etc.

Seems like, if this system recognizes most road users, and produces a false sense of confidence in the driver that it’ll recognize all, it might be bad news to some road users.


#12

first bike/pedestrian that gets hit will have the media all over volvo like they were with Toyota a few years ago