Vacuum line replacement


#1

Vacuum lines on my car (1997 Buick Regal GS) are a hard plastic with rubber nipples that connect line to vacuum source. Some of these nipples are straight, some are at 90 a degree angle. Some are cracked, causing vacuum leaks. Does anyone make a kit with an assortment of these rubber pieces?


#2

You can find generic plastic vacuum tees, elbows, couplers, and caps at almost any auto parts store. Just ask the clerk, tell them you need a package of vacuum tees, they’ll show you right where to go.


#3

Not looking for tees.


#4

Look at exploded view on Dealers parts screen. Order individually by part number.


#5

They sell packages of tees, elbows, couplers (what I believe you’re referring to as “straight nipples”), and caps all in the same section, often times in mixed-bag packages.

You can go to the dealer and spend 4 bucks for each individual piece, or you can spend 2 bucks at a parts store for a plastic bag full of assorted vacuum line pieces.


#6

order from exploded view of dealer parts as the materials, sizes, etc. are all exact and not expensive.


#7

Heat shrink can be used to repair these plastic vacuum lines. Slip a length of heat shrink onto the broken vacuum line, and while holding the broken ends together, heat the heat shrink with a heat gun or hair dryer.

Tester


#8

why fool around with all this extra work and then not have it original. This job could be done inexpensively and with OEM parts and at a lot less effort and time… Sometimes it’s just better to do the right thing.


#9

Good tip tester.
I read somewhere some lines needed different thickness so you need to get the correct ones if you replace them.


#10

Try calling the dealer for a 2001 Infinity QX4 and ask for replacement vacuum lines. If you can wait three weeks they MIGHT be able to get them. In the mean time the vehicle has a vacuum leak and the owner needs the vehicle NOW. What do you do? What do you do??

Tester


#11

this is a buick and has tons of dealers and parts available.


#12

This is a 12 year old car. A lot of parts are no longer stocked by the dealer.


#13

still would be the 1st thing I would try, then adapt if you have to.