Turbocharger Replacement

mazda
cx-7

#101

Good point. …I’m not a professional race car driver. However, I am certified to run Super Speedway NASCAR tracks. When I do drive, I show up to the tracks with my gear and hop into someone else’s ride. I know what a car needs and it’s up to the engineers to make it happen.

Not many people get the opportunity to drive a 775 hp stock car at Daytona, Texas, Charlotte and Darlington. I’m in a unique situation. I come from a racing family that had ties to some of the most famous drivers in NASCAR, I’ve been running (…not racing) Super Speedway for over 25 years and it doesn’t hurt my sister’s husband is a famous country music artist.

If you think that’s fishy…I can see why you would say that, but welcome to my life. Lol


#102

Synthetic oil is warranted for 15,000 miles. Read the bottle!

…and if those dumb mechanics at Bob Moore Mazda did what we asked them to do and what every other professional mechanic would have done, the 12,500 miles I drove on Synthetic oil would not have damaged my car.


#103

FINALLY…someone completely understands my delima!!!

…and you are also 100% correct about naming Bob Moore Auto Group…if I didn’t already give them SO MANY chances to work with me. I’ve spoken to the Service Advisor on my car, his boss who is the Service Manager, the General Manager of the Mazda Dealership and the COO of Bob Moore Auto Group.

Everyone said I didn’t follow the recommended service intervals after the turbo replacement and they did NOTHING wrong and I can’t prove it. The COO told me “We will just have to agree, to disagree”. I told him that I will take them to court and address my situation through social media as well as using my dead vehicle at critical Bob Moore locations to share my experiences with as many people that will listen.

I filed my complaint with the Oklahoma Attorney General’s office and they attempted to mediate. Bob Moore LIED, LIED and LIED about every rebuttal they made to the AG. All I asked for was to meet me half way and they told me to take a hike!

I gave them every opportunity to step up.

Now I am telling everyone Bob Moore has a D- BBB rating (52 cases in 36 months) and 9 unresolved cases with the Oklahoma AG. All is public information. The New Honda Accord I had to buy my wife to replace the car Bob Moore Mazda destroyed, is from a dealer in Little Rock with an A+ BBB rating and accredited with the BBB, unlike Bob Moore Auto Group.

YOU ARE SPOT ON! Why is this so difficult for people to understand? It’s reasonable…common…fricking…sense. I’m being vilified and Bob Moore Auto Group is Dick Dastardly with 17 car dealerships throughout Oklahoma and ready to do the same to unsuspecting buyers and customers. If they were reasonable, this would have been resolved 18 months ago. Who are the 52 people that needed help and went to all the trouble to file complaints with the BBB and 9 to the Oklahoma AG? There are so many complaints that Bob Moore stopped trying to resolve customer complaints.

I spoke the General Manager at Bob Moore Ford last week. I told him who I was and my story. He promised someone will contact me the next day and if they didn’t, he would. STILL WAITING FOR THAT RETURN PHONE CALL. OMG!!!


#104

That’s not for SYNTHETIC oil…which I use. Read the posts!


#105

With that post, You gave Your opponent all the evidence needed to prove that You neglected the vehicle.
The bottle may say 15k or 50k or, 150k. It doesn’t matter, because the manual in Your glovebox says something very different. If the manual says - as an example, I do not know what Your manual says - oil has to be changed no later than after 7500 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first, then that’s it. Exceeding what the manual tells You to do, to maintain Your vehicle properly with regards to oil changes is neglect and would/should void any and all warranty.


#106

I would take $5,000 and they can have the car.

After 3 years of payments, I paid $12,000 to pay off my loan right before all this happened. I had to spent $3,000 for the turbo repair…for a total of $15,000.

I believe $5,000 is reasonable.


#107

Like a little old lady…not the one from Pasadina. Lol


#108

In the middle would be nice!


#109

The only thing that matters…

I should have been given my options by the Mazda Service Shop after they evaluated my vehicle before they replaced the turbo.

I wasn’t and therefore they are at fault. End of story!


#110

That will never happen. Nor do I think it should. That just doesn’t make any sense.

Forget all the arguments here about oil change intervals and oil types and PCV systems. I’m on your side, in that I agree that the dealer did not properly address the base cause of your first turbo failure. Instead of just replacing the turbo and sending you on your way, they should have determined the root cause of the failure and recommend you repair it accordingly. This isn’t coming from any service manual, since the factory manual doesn’t state that an oil change is required upon turbo replacement. This just comes from my adherence to the principle of best practices. It’s just an opinion.

What the dealer did was a partial, incomplete repair. Now, I can tell you, as a professional in my field with nearly 30 years experience (can I really be that old?) in auto repair, that if your first turbo died because of engine sludge, the engine was done for as well. Any cleaning or flushing would only be postponing the inevitable.

The dealer should have replaced the engine as well as the turbo at the first visit. Their failure to replace the engine led to the premature failure of the turbo 12,000 miles later. So in fact all they owe you is the completion of the repair, at the price they should have quoted you at the first visit, minus any damage caused by the failure to replace the engine. In short, they owe you a turbo when you pay them for a replacement engine. A replacement engine they should have sold you the first time around.

You’re essentially asking them to buy a non-operating car for $5000. I don’t see how you get there.

The facts of the matter are that the dealer followed the published service procedure from Mazda for replacing the turbo and the turbo lasted through the warranty period. I think that’s all a judge or arbitrator is going to look at.


#111

I’m not the expert, so I can’t say definitively why the first turbo failed. Since Bob Moore Mazda is the expert, they should have told me why they believe the turbo failed.
Once I had the info from Bob Moore I could have made an informed decision before they installed a new turbo in my CX-7, but that didn’t happen.

S. ent via the Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone-------- Original message --------From: asemaster cartalk@discoursemail.com Date: 1/4/2017 10:12 PM (GMT-06:00) To: kevin.weisinger@gmail.com Subject: [Car Talk Community] [Maintenance/Repairs] Turbocharger Replacement

          asemaster
          

          January 5

kevin.weisinger:

I would take $5,000 and they can have the car.
After 3 years of payments, I paid $12,000 to pay off my loan right before all this happened. I had to spent $3,000 for the turbo repair…for a total of $15,000.
I believe $5,000 is reasonable.

That will never happen. Nor do I think it should. That just doesn’t make any sense.

Forget all the arguments here about oil change intervals and oil types and PCV systems. I’m on your side, in that I agree that the dealer did not properly address the base cause of your first turbo failure. Instead of just replacing the turbo and sending you on your way, they should have determined the root cause of the failure and recommend you repair it accordingly. This isn’t coming from any service manual, since the factory manual doesn’t state that an oil change is required upon turbo replacement. This just comes from my adherence to the principle of best practices. It’s just an opinion.

What the dealer did was a partial, incomplete repair. Now, I can tell you, as a professional in my field with nearly 30 years experience (can I really be that old?) in auto repair, that if your first turbo died because of engine sludge, the engine was done for as well. Any cleaning or flushing would only be postponing the inevitable.

The dealer should have replaced the engine as well as the turbo at the first visit. Their failure to replace the engine led to the premature failure of the turbo 12,000 miles later. So in fact all they owe you is the completion of the repair, at the price they should have quoted you at the first visit, minus any damage caused by the failure to replace the engine. In short, they owe you a turbo when you pay them for a replacement engine. A replacement engine they should have sold you the first time around.

You’re essentially asking them to buy a non-operating car for $5000. I don’t see how you get there.

The facts of the matter are that the dealer followed the published service procedure from Mazda for replacing the turbo and the turbo lasted through the warranty period. I think that’s all a judge or arbitrator is going to look at.

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          kevin.weisinger
          

          January 4
        
      
    
  


  I would take $5,000 and they can have the car. 

After 3 years of payments, I paid $12,000 to pay off my loan right before all this happened. I had to spent $3,000 for the turbo repair…for a total of $15,000.

I believe $5,000 is reasonable.

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#112

You don’t seem to understand that full synthetic motor oil will get contaminated just as easily a regular motor oil and can also sludge quickly depending upon various factors which I mentioned earlier.

The only advantage synthetic oil has over regular motor oil is that it can stand up to heat a little better.

Depending upon those various factors even 5k miles can be too long on synthetic oil in some cases.

Per my prior post about the new Subaru that was transferred by one of the flunkies at the regional office to the dealer where I worked. That was a brand new car with a total of 550 miles (NOT a typo…) on it at the time it was delivered to us. The car was full of factory synthetic and the turbocharger was wiped due to coked motor oil.
It was all due to driving habits; which in this case meant an aggressive foot for about 450 miles.


#113

If Subaru sells vehicles whose turbos can be fried and engine oil coked in 550 miles simply by driving aggressively, then where does the fault lie?


#114

I agree with Joe. but that just reinforces my opinion to never buy an engine with a turbo.


#117

BBB- Bob Moore Auto Group

As a concerned Oklahoman I believe you need to retract your false accusations of the BBB rating. Bob Moore Auto Group is rated A+(. While there seem to be issues, there is no reason to lie. Have you provided proof of your regular maintenance or is it available to see on Carfax? If you have spoken to Mazda and they have also told you the mechanics are not at fault here wouldn’t it be fair to assume that it is your responsibility as a citizen to properly maintain your vehicle, which it sounds like you in fact did not do. Being angry is one thing. Providing false information is another.


#118

When’s the last time someone even looked at a BBB rating before dealing with a company? The OP certainly didn’t.


#119

There is also more than one Mazda dealer in OKC, if he is that upset at Bob Moore, there are others to choose from.


#120

@JoeMario, just my opinion but the Subaru turbo I referenced was fried due to nothing more than a heavy foot.
The guy covered almost 450 miles in something like 6 hours time and that included half a dozen large metro areas along the way.

He must have been in full boost the entire time. There was so much heat from the turbocharger (which was likely glowing red) that it blistered the paint on the hood.

This wasn’t a common problem with Subarus at all.


#121

He must have been in full boost the entire time. I guess I have to reply: so what? Where in the manual does it say you can’t do that? If I bought a Subaru and drove it that way (not that I would, but perhaps 40 years ago…), could I get a free replacement every 500 miles? How many times could I do that, dozens?


#122

It shouldn’t take 6 hours to drive 450 miles @130 MPH, he must have spent 3 hours in the cities.

To travel 450 miles in 6 hours is no problem out west, people drive 85 MPH on the interstates. One of my friends told me he set his cruise control @ 110 MPH though the state of Utah and part of Colorado on a ski trip, no fires.