Theft prevention


#1

One of the major networks just had a segment on thefts from cars. Hackers are apparently building a device that they place under the car that will detect and store the signal that your FOB transmits when you unlock the car. The thief then comes back later at a time of his choosing, unlocks the car with the signal, and steals whatever he wants, without setting off the alarm of doing any damage. An expert they had on built one for $30 that worked flawlessly on every car they tried it on. Apparently there’s bee a rash of these thefts lately.

The network missed the simplest and most obvious way to prevent the thefts… use your key to unlock the car and the button on the armrest (or wherever your manufacturer placed it) to lock it. Thought I’d pass this tip on. It’s simple, can be developed into a habit, and will prevent theft by not transmitting a signal.


#2

It’s getting tough out there to make a living I guess.


#3

Not if you’re a thief! :cry:


#4

But it takes planning and time by the thief, which most are not up for.


#5

Not really. If a thief knows his neighbor carries a briefcase and/or valuables in his/her car, he simply puts the device under the car and comes back to get it when the car is gone. Then he can open the car in the middle of the night of his choice. It’s a lot easier than trying to break into a car… and less risky. Remember that a lot of people in urban areas live in highrises and use parking garages.

I can’t be too difficult. It’s happening.


#6

I thought they used a changing code system on car fobs. No? By “changing code system”, I mean the signal transmitted by the fob to open the car door is different each time. Somehow both the fob and the receiver in the car know or can figure out the sequence how it changes I guess. So with that technique it wouldn’t work to capture the signal and re-use it. I’m starting to think I’m wrong about how that fob system works. In that case it’s a no brainer: The fob system is entirely unsecure and owners should revert to using the key to unlock the car like in the old days.


#7

Sure the manual key open is a way to avoid signal interception, good idea.


#8

The network missed the simplest and most obvious way to prevent the thefts… use your key to unlock the car

Fewer and fewer cars have keys these days…


#9

Fewer and fewer cars have keys these days is an incredible leap of faith to software (key fob control) vs hardware (key in lock) dependance, kind of scary. In charge among other things computer security at work, I have the systems locked down it is not unusual to see a few hundred access violation rules blocked for computers, firefox update, flash update, etc. Sure It is handled on an as needed basis, but there are so many avenues of attack, and after 2 episodes of having to restore and rebuild computers due to cryptolocker I do not care to take a chance, only oversee 60 computers at this point.


#10

Not to totally change the subject but this one still baffles me, and a word to the wise to be aware of your surroundings. Can’t remember if it was a year or two but a jeweler was at a show in Chicago and took off back to Minnesota with at least $50,000 worth of jewels in the car. They drove all the way to Minnesota and stopped at a rest stop. They took turns to use the facilities so the car was never alone but the guy still got jumped and the jewels stolen. They had been tracked all the way from Chicago, about 450 miles. Found the car abandoned about 20 more miles ahead but no sign of the loot. So had to be a well planned job and with more than one car involved. Can’t imagine being tracked for that long but guess you have to watch your back.


#11

Any thing is game stradovarious violin

"Almond was attacked with a stun gun and robbed of the instrument 10 days ago after a performance at Wisconsin Lutheran College. The robber then fled to a maroon minivan driven by a woman.


#12

I just never leave anything of value in a car.


#13

another prevention: when you drive away, look at the spot where you parked for anything unusual on the ground. Difficult, I know. I’d have to stop, get out of the car and walk back to check.


#14
I just never leave anything of value in a car.

Friend of mine parked his car while meeting up with friends at a bar. Came out to find the side window smashed and a cinder block sitting in the front passenger seat. The guy broke in by smashing the window…then proceeded to smash the dash until he could rip the $50 cheap car stereo out of his car.

Meanwhile sitting in the back seat left untouched was a $900 pair of binoculars.

Sometimes it just doesn’t matter.


#15

Ase, Barky, I thought of that, but I’m not familiar with any new car that doesn’t have a key as a backup. Can anybody name one?


#16
MikeInNH I just never leave anything of value in a car. Friend of mine parked his car while meeting up with friends at a bar. Came out to find the side window smashed and a cinder block sitting in the front passenger seat. The guy broke in by smashing the window...then proceeded to smash the dash until he could rip the $50 cheap car stereo out of his car.

Meanwhile sitting in the back seat left untouched was a $900 pair of binoculars.

Sometimes it just doesn’t matter.

I remember seeing an old beater of a Honda Civic in the parking lot with a hand lettered sign in the window saying “this car is not locked, the radio has already been stolen, please don’t smash another window”.


#17

“this car is not locked, the radio has already been stolen, please don’t smash another window”.

Back in the early '80s, I saw a sign that said essentially the same thing, in the window of a BMW parked in Manhattan. In those days, the theft of high-end German audio systems was rampant in NYC.

The joke–which isn’t really funny–was that BMW stood for Break My Window.


#18
Barkydog Any thing is game stradovarious violin

"Almond was attacked with a stun gun and robbed of the instrument 10 days ago after a performance at Wisconsin Lutheran College. The robber then fled to a maroon minivan driven by a woman.

Where do you fence a stolen Stradivarius violin? The problem is that everybody knows that particular violin was stolen so you can’t sell it to anyone because they won’t “own” it if they bought it.
Possibly the best those thieves could do is hold it for ransom.


#19

True, I never did see what the value was. The reward though was $100K so suppose it was up there. Who knows? Probably could be sold for $50K or so to the right party. There is a black market for famous paintings too that never see the light of day but big bucks are paid for them. So I’m told anyway. Never seen any myself.


#20
Where do you fence a stolen Stradivarius violin? The problem is that everybody knows that particular violin was stolen so you can't sell it to anyone because they won't "own" it if they bought it. Possibly the best those thieves could do is hold it for ransom.

There are people who collect stolen art all the time for private collections. Anything of value or an antique has value in the black market.