Still a new driver?

honda
accord

#1

I’ve been driving for nearly three years now and am wondering when the “new driver” status should change (along with the insurance rates). I feel like I’m well past that status, have never had a ticket or, anything that would make me have to pay more…

I’ve tried asking the insurance company… but, they’re not very helpful nor do they give me a direct answer.

So, am I, still, a new driver?


#2

Age is the biggest factor. Young (not just ‘new’) drivers have on average a much higher rate of accidents. You may well be a good driver, but the insurance companies can’t be sure of that. Make sure you’re getting whatever discounts they offer for good grades, etc.

Also, check out all the different companies, you might find one with lower rates.

Only time will get your rates down.


#3

I think that depends on several factors. If you started driving at 16 then “nearly” three years would put you in the 18 year old category which is a new driver. I was 25 years old before I could rent a vehicle because I was considered a new driver. I had been driving for 9 years but Hertz and Enterprise had other ideas.

Experience and types of vehicles also determine the worthiness of a driver. Do you drive both standard and automatic transmission equipped vehicles? Have you driven a large truck or motorhome? Have you driven on major interstate highways? Have you driven cross-country or while towing a trailer? Have you driven in the mountains? There are many other driving situations that come to mind but I think you can get an idea of what I’m talking about.

It takes many years to become a safe and experienced driver. Insurance companies tend to be very conservative when it comes to protecting their assets so they may consider you a “new” driver for many more years. Decreased premiums will eventually come your way but when and where remains to be seen. Good luck!


#4

Sorry but 3 years is still considered a Young driver…And I agree with the insurance companies.

Age and years of driving/insured is what insurance companies go by.


#5

It may depend on your state’s insurance regulations. For Massachusetts we have:

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Junior Operator Law designates individuals age 16 to 25 years old and licensed fewer than six years to be inexperienced drivers. Inexperienced drivers will typically pay higher automobile premiums due to the negative combined statistical driving records of this segment of the population.

Here’s a link to some data Massachusetts collected on the higher claims rate for inexperienced drivers:


#6

Thanks.
I didn’t start driving until I was 26 and will be 30 soon with a baby on the way. I am also a teacher and am covered under the school’s insurance to drive a 14 passenger bus, which I prefer not to do, but will if it’s necessary.
Currently, I am only driving an automatic vehicle, but we do have another standard vehicle in our home. We’ve driven cross country in this car through horrible weather, on highways, etc.
Perhaps, I should call other insurance companies and do a little comparison…
Thank you.


#7

Well, now you’ve given us some info on your very specific circumstances. You definitely should shop around.


#8

Thank you.
This is helpful as we live in Massachusetts.
I wonder if my insurance company could take my age, occupation, and the experience i do have into consideration.
My driving record is much cleaner than my partner’s yet, his rates are lower because he’s been driving for more years than I have.

Thanks for providing the link… sometimes it’s difficult figuring out exactly what you’re looking for and where to go for the information.


#9

I wonder if my insurance company could take my age, occupation, and the experience i do have into consideration.

NOPE…They’ll take what ever will yield them the MOST profit.

Mass is also one of the states where insurance is regulated…this means that there will be very little difference between the rates from one insurer to another (if any at all).