Stalling when Cold/windy HELP PLEASE

hyundai
accent

#1

2008 Hyundai Account 4door
78,721 Miles
I’ve only had it for a year.
Taken it to dealership they performed diagnostic test, no codes.
When its cold my car shuts off while driving and is difficult to remain on after starting it. When temperature is about 70 degrees car runs fine.
I have tried new battery…didn’t work.
I have replaced spark plugs…didn’t work.


#2

Strange. I was going to suggest a bad idle air control valve (IACV) until I saw the video you just posted. The car starts and runs for several seconds and then dies. And you said once it dies while driving. So I don’t think it’s the IACV.

Other possible culprits:
Fuel pump
Throttle position sensor
Crankshaft position sensor

All these can go bad intermittently, working most of the time but occasionally cutting out.


#3

HERE A VIDEO


#4

yeah I have more videos during the day as well. nobody knows what it could be
the dealership was going to start charging me 115 an hour to work on it. smh. I said no thank you.


#5

I live in texas and the weather at the moment starts off in the 50 and rises throughout afternoon.
acts up in the mornings at the lows.


#6

This is a long shot, but there is a 2010 service bulletin to update the software in the car’s computer. Have you had that done? It should be free at the dealer, and it can’t hurt, might help.


#7

Generally when an engine runs fine once warm but has trouble when cold, the first thing that comes to my mind is the temp sensor. This won’t directly store a code either, because the ECU doesn’t compare it to anything. In short, the ECU thinks the engine is warm and meters the fuel accordingly, which can be too lean for a cold engine to operate. Realize that an engine runs at 210+/-F, so 50F is cold.

Bottom line: check the temp sensor output. NOTE: this will be the one that sends the signal to the ECU. You’ll have more than one, as the cooling fan is turned on & off by a temp sensor too.


#8

I was thinking temp sensor too.


#9

I had a truck that the distributer cap would get wet when cold and wet and windy, even after I replaced it.


#10

Is it still under warranty? That can matter, but generally dealerships can’t be bothered. It seems that if the computer doesn’t tell them what to do (the “diagnostic test / codes”) they won’t do anything. It’s actually a shame because it’s really not that hard for a mechanic to at least find out why a car is stalling / not running.

So I would say that you want to ask around among people you know for a locally owned independent shop. Explain it, and leave the car with them overnight when you know it will be chilly in the morning. You need someone who will do good old-fashioned brain-work and still knows how to operate with a computer. No matter how wacky these things get with computers and sensors the basic stuff that makes an engine work hasn’t changed - suck in some gas & air, compress it - a lot - and blow it up with a spark. When you get right down to it, it’s still just about that.

One of my first things, by the way, would be to check the coolant temp sensor as noted. I would not rule out the idle air control valve or some other “air” type of problem. And it needs to have the fuel pressure and injector operation monitored when cold, along with spark output.


#11

Another vote for the CTS.


#12

I think the IAT (Intake Air Temp Sensor) could also be a culprit. It seem plausible, since the engine’s behavior is linked to the ambient temperature. A proper scan tool should be able to display the sensor readings and it should be easy to see what’s wrong.