Shell Nitrogen Additive


#1

we have used shell gas a long time , however we have noticed a discoloration of the paint when the gas drips on the side of the car. we have a 6 month old white audi and can not get the discoloration out.the dealer has said he has heard this from a number of people and he could not get the discoloration out. we have brown stains on the side of the car.


#2

I’m gonna bump this one. I’d like to hear more on this too, in case I need it.

We had a true chemist sign on to discuss the nitrogen additive for an earlier post. His/her knowledge was humbling. I’m hoping he/she will join us on this thread.


#3

Any gas will eat away at the paint if it is allowed to drip down the side of the car. Next time this happens, be sure to immediately wipe up any mess you make before it has a chance to dry. This was a problem long before Shell started its Nitrogen marketing campaign.


#4

Whitey, I agree that repeated exposure will discolor paint, but i got the impression that this formulation seems to be more aggressive.

I hope my impression is wrong. But I would like to hear something about the chemistry involved.


#5

whitey
I do wipe the gas away immediately. I filled up yesterday and the gas dripped on the car - wiped right away - stain would not go away. This has not happened before - result was immediate discoloration.


#6

The Shell “nitrogen additive” is more about marketing than chemistry…Many cars are now painted with crappy water-based finishes that are more susceptible to stains. I would try to avoid spilling gasoline on my car. That’s MUCH easier than trying to remove stains…


#7

If’n the dealere don’t know nothing about the paint problem, go to Audi America. Audi may be unawares there is a problem. How can they know if no one tells them?


#8

Try claying the spot. Claying can remove some of these stubborn marks and claying is easier on paint than cleaners.


#9

This is nice to know since I sometimes fill up at a Shell station. I’ll be careful not to spill gas on my car.


#10

This is a relatively new car, right? It might be the car, not the gas. After all, your dealer “said he has heard this from a number of people.”