Problems seeing behind and to the side of car

vision

#1

Can anyone recommend a car with a good view to the side and back-- I am a small person and want to trade my Honda Element in for a car with better sightlines. Any recommendations?


#2

Generally, a sedan will be your best bet. But you’ll need to actually sit in various cars to see how they work for you. Avoid cars with wide roof pillars.


#3

My first recommendation is try upgrading your mirrors. Have you tried adding those blindspot extra mirrors to see if it improves. The rear is a little harder but there may be a solution there too. There is nothing anyone can really recommend since people vary in torso and leg length and vehicles vary so much. Its very individual.


#4

Well, at least I can tell you what NOT to buy. Unless you want to feel like you are sitting in a tunnel, do not buy a Chrysler 300 or a Dodge Magnum. The Dodge Charger is poor in terms of visibility too. And, the Toyota FJ Cruiser allows virtually no vision to the sides or the rear. Cross these vehicles off of your list!


#5

do you have the seat all the way up? and/or add seat cushions? (you can get pedal extenders if needed)


#6

I’ll second the suggestion of trying those little round stick on mirrors. Experiment with their placement on the side mirrors for the best view. They help tremendously with obstructed views and can actually allow you to see much further behind the vehicle due to their shape. They cost a buck or two at Walmart and can be easily removed if you decide you don’t like them. They come in a variety of sizes to suit almost any application. I’d try that before I gave up on the ride altogether.


#7

AMC Pacer.

For a real answer…the best thing you can do is drive them. A vehicle may be perfect for me but not good for you. It’s really a matter of trial and error. My wife is only 5’2 and she doesn’t have a problem driving her Lexus or past Accords. I don’t either and I’m 6’3. Most cars will fit a wide range of heights.


#8

yes! I had a rented Chrysler 300 for a drive around Wyoming and SD. Worse car I’ve ever been in for visibility. The visibility out the front is so bad that the rear view mirror seemed to block half the window.


#9

The Chevy HHR is pretty terrible too. The windshield feels way too tiny for that vehicle. My mother really liked it but my whole family was against it, so she went with an Impala.


#10

Just a suggestion…make sure your mirrors are properly adjusted. Most people don’t. The side mirrors should be MUCH farther out so as NOT to overlap the overhead rear view. Uncomfortable at first, but helps eliminat blind spots. Go on line and look up proper adjustment.
It made me a believer. There is a special technique…


#11

ps try http://www.linquist.net/motorsports/tech/mirrors/


#12

I would suggest that since each of us have different vision problems. For year I had a difficult time seeing behind me because I had an injury that limited my head motion. I can’t judge what will give YOU the best view.

In my case I took up rowing and after a while the motion needed to see behind me while I rowed, loosed up my neck so now I am back to normal. I can see just fine in my car now.

Your being short is likely the issue so you might ask others who are about your height what they have and how they like it.


#13

BMW Mini?

Seriously, a small, upright sporty car can have better sightlines for a small person than a larger car.


#14

I set my mirrors that way and it works well. A good way to get the mirrors close to the optimum settings is to lean left until your head touches the window while staring at the driver’s outside mirror. Set the mirror so that you barely see the rear fender. Then move your head over the center console while staring at the passenger’s outside mirror. Set the mirror so that you barely see the rear fender. If you don’t have power mirrors you can have a friend help you with the outside passenger’s side mirror. You and your friend can adjust to optimize as shown in mconn’s link on a parking lot. If you do have power mirrors, you can adjust them for optimum settings in the parking lot or on the road if you are careful.