New Radiotor blows WaterPump?

pump
radiators

#1

Hello,

I’ve got a beautiful 1995 Toyota 4Runner that transformed itsel into a 4StandArouner after several issues.

I had the radiator replaced, because my local mechanics told me “well it’s got a big’ol crack in it…” cost 550$

Driving with this beautiful new shiny radiator for a week, only 2miles to and from work - then suddenly one day after I decide to drive 10miles the heat shoots up - I look at the gage an can’t believe it, tap tap - oops it goes even higher (don’t forget I have a BRAND NEW RADIATOR). Once well in the red I pull over, call and cuss out my mechanics who suggest I bring it in (wow who would’ve thought). It gets towed there, and my friends tell me “… ohhh nooo the radiator is fine, not it’s your waterpump… which will cost you another 500-600 buckaroos…” That’s great, for the ones making the money, not for me though.

Q: HOW LIKELY IS IT THAT 1 WEEK AFTER A NEW RADIATOR HAS BEEN INSTALLED, THE WATER PUMP TO FAIL MISERABLY, ALTHOUGH THE CAR HAS NEVER EVER PREVIOUSLY OVER HEATED?

ARE THEY HAVING ME ON, OR IS THIS A LIKELY EVENT?


#2

The timing belt on this vehicle should be replaced every 60k miles, along with that (at the same time) the water pump should be replaced (to save labor cost) as the two are located behind the same cover. (lets say I think they are)

If the water pump was on its way out, the new radiator MAY have added more pressure during the coolant recycling.

BTW, did those mechs actually SHOW you the crack in the rad or did you just take their word for it?

Collapsed or plugged coolant hoses can cause an interruption in coolant flow and cause over-heating too.


#3

The Mechanics did not SHOW me anything, I just took their word for it - Over the years I’ve spent thousands of dollars there, so I thought I could trust them…
the truck has 105K miles, only - and apparently the timing belt is okay… that’s what they said.
But, still a darn coincidence or bad luck for the two to go subsequently…


#4

Your scenario is not unusual. Back in the late 1950’s, our family had a 1954 Buick that was near the 100,000 mile mark. On a vacation, a filling station operator sold us a new radiator cap (these were when service station attendants did their best to sell parts). We completed the trip, but then the water pump began to leak. The new radiator cap allowed the cooling system to build up its normal pressure, which forced the water pump seals to leak. Upon replacing the water pump, the radiator then began to leak and had to be repaired. After all this happened, the thermostat failed and was stuck open. In your case, the leaking radiator relieved the pressure in the system. When it was replaced, the water pump couldn’t take the additional pressure.


#5

Ohhh my god!
This seems to be a vicious cycle then… so I can now wait for the thermostat to fail aaaahhhrrrrrrgggg!
Thanks, this redeems my poor mechanics, who are actually great.


#6

There’s nothing unusual about this.It’s very possible for the cooling system pressure to go back up after radiator replacement and then leading to a weakened water pump failing.
The vehicle is 13 years old. Water pumps, radiators, thermostats, and a thousand other things are all bills waiting to come due.

Same thing with an old house. Eventually the plumbing rots, starts to fail,and one can replace it all at once or one piece at a time.


#7

I think I agree with the others. Its kind of foolish though to go to the work of the radiator and not do the other parts at the same time including the hoses, belts, pump, and thermostat.


#8

Very, very likely. Be happy that you don’t own a Ford or the heater core would go next week. It’s something thay are still known for since 1960.