Mecum Auction


#1

Tonight I am watching a re-run of the mid November Orange County auction. I watch these to see the vehicles that are for sale. I have not noticed this in prior auctions but in this case the auctioneer is babbling at more than twice the volume of the commentators who are describing the vehicles. I don’t know what the auctioneer is screaming and don’t care. The current bid is displayed on-screen. I am very interested in the vehicle description which I can’t hear.


#2

I watch a few auctions myself but my wife hates it because the background noise gives her a headache. I guess it is worse if you are not even watching and the noise is in the background.


#3

There are times like this I’m grateful for my 60% hearing loss so I just watch them roll across the block…

The only reason auctioneers babble so fast is to generate hype and create a sense of urgency in the bidding.


#4

I’ve been to a Mecum Auction. The auctioneer is there to keep the crowd and bidders excited and attentive. The commentators have nothing to do with the auction, the bidders are there and have already seen the cars. The commentary is just for the TV, not as important as the people there bidding on the cars.


#5

I’ve watched it a couple times…and I agree way too much background noise.


#6

Solution is Closed Captions and low volume.


#7

VOLVO V70: Thank you. I have never used Closed Captions so I didn’t think of it. I can even switch the amp to play CDs or mp3s.


#8

I can’t stand the chaos of auctions. Or, for that matter, bingo games.


#9
I can't stand the chaos of auctions.

I use to go to auctions. Problem I found is that I was bidding against idiots. Last time I went this fool bid $600 for a 3yo Crafstman 10" Contractors tablesaw. At the time a new one was selling at Sears for $550. After the auction I told the guy he paid too much…but he was convinced that saw sold for $800 new at Sears. Oh well…


#10

Some people like the action. I figure I have enough stimulus in my life anyway, I’d just as soon find someplace relaxing. To each his own.


#11

I used to go to computer auctions about 25 to 30 years ago, and there wa always someone willing to pay new prices for old goods. I stopped going because of that.


#12

Years ago, my youngest brother was an auctioneer. He had a sale which involved tools. The crowd got so ‘enthused’ the SnapOn man was dragging the tools in from his truck and putting them on the block.


#13
I used to go to computer auctions about 25 to 30 years ago, and there wa always someone willing to pay new prices for old goods. I stopped going because of that.

I knew this engineer who went to an auction at a hospital and bought an old Dec-10 system. paid $4000 for it. i told him he was nuts. He had to rent a truck to take it to his house. Took him all day.

Then every day after work we would melt the gold off the THOUSANDS of connectors. Took him over a month…and would up $30,000 richer. They used a lot of gold in those systems…and he knew it.


#14

I use to go to auctions. Problem I found is that I was bidding against idiots. After the auction I told the guy he paid too much…

How much is too much?

https://www.mecum.com/news-item/2377/Mecum-Raises-The-Bar-In-Seattle--35-Million-For-1971-Hemi-Cuda-Convertible/

I was there for this auction, afterwards I could have reached out and touched this car as it sat on the show floor. And all the time I was thinking, $3.5 million for a car that sold for what, maybe 4 grand new?


#15

I simply cannot understand what could make a car worth millions. I just don’t get it.
Same with artwork.

I realize that many wealthy investors “park” their money in “hard assets” rather than trusting it in an unstable market, but I still don’t get it.


#16

I guess I’ve just never been that infatuated with the old muscle cars. Sure they’re fast and handle well but you aren’t exactly going to go out and race a $3.5 million 40 year old car. Just kind of tired of them all including Mustangs. Now give me a 57 or 61 Ford or Mercury, a Thunderbird, or 58 or 59 Chevy or even a non-rusted Plymouth or Desoto. Now those are classics with good styling.


#17

I don’t understand antiques either. Especially keeping them in original condition…no matter how bad it is. My grandmother had a room full of antique furniture…you couldn’t sit on any of the chairs because they were all on the verge of falling apart. When she died we sold that room for more then we sold the house for.


#18

the same mountainbike: Auctions and bingo games. Two things I would never attend on purpose.


#19

The reason you don’t get it is evident in your terminology. You called them INVESTORS but they’re actually using disposable income to make ACQUISITIONS. They’re not buying those things to eventually sell them for a profit. They acquire them so they can show off their collections to others to help convey the level of their wealth…It’s a lot of money to most people but I’d be willing to bet it’s pin money for that person. It’s all matter of perspective.


#20

The people making the TV show have control over the volume. You’d think they could figure out is is disrupting to watch the show. Then again, I always hated how loud they play music at wedding receptions too. Nobody can even talk that sh!t is so loud. I got tons of compliments at my wedding for having the music toned down enough so everyone could actually enjoy themselves, whether dancing or talking…go figure