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Load range 'E' tires

A friend has a trailer with 205/75-15 load range ‘e’ tires, which he can’t find. even tire rack can’t help, anyone know of any? or, anyone know of alternate size or an alternate load range. he doesn’t carry much by weight, but some cargo is bulky. it is a trailer with 4 wheels ( 2 per side) any help would be very much appreciated. PS: I don’t know year or maker of the trailer…

Here’s a chart he can use. He can select any tire of the same size with a higher load range. The site, Tirerack, is even a good source for tires.

Looks like to get a E load rating you have to go to a 225/75-15
http://www.etrailer.com/dept-pg-Tires_and_Wheels-sf-Tire_Only-hs-Load_Range_E-pc-15_Inch.aspx


Buying all four you can change a tad a be alright.
load range d,
215/75-15
215/70-15
etc
For the larger diameter tires look to see the clearance in the wheel well and between tires.

First, my books don’t list a Load Range E in an ST205/75R15. The books I am looking in are the standards books - so if someone ever offered this combination, they did it on their own and without industry and governmental approval - highly unlikely!

Second, these are ST tires - which are different animals than Passenger car tires. They are more like LT tires.

Crusty, I’m afraid your friend is going to have to do some work. He likely will need to go up to a larger tire size - ST225/75R15. They are about an 1" larger in diameter, about 1/2" wider (on the same rim), and he can use a Load Range D.

And lastly, it is pretty common for trailers to be provided with marginal tires (or worse!). An upgrade in the form of a larger size or a higher load range is a good preventative step to take. A tire failure can damage a lot of stuff around the fender - and they usually happen at the most inopportune time.

I only use passenger car or truck tires on my trailers. Trailer tires, as @CapriRacer suggests, are different animals because they are usually weaker than passenger car or truck tires. The last travel trailer I owned had a nice set of Michelin tires and it handled beautifully on the road. It’s a bit more expense but it’s worth every penny.

A local independent tire dealer stocks 7.50x15 trailer tires in D, E, and F load ranges for trailers but installs automotive C range tires when heavy loads are not being hauled. The heavier tires are for trailers carrying back hoes, front end loaders, etc. The owner says a little common sense goes a long way in keeping customers happy and coming back.

missleman said: “…Trailer tires, as @CapriRacer suggests, are different animals because they are usually weaker than passenger car or truck tires…”

Actually, No! ST tires are built similar to LT tires, and STRONGER than passenger car tires. It’s a little hard to explain, but the load carrying capacity of ST tires is higher than for both passenger car and light truck tires (for the same size).

Rod Knox said: “…but installs automotive C range tires when heavy loads are not being hauled…”

Again, No! Passenger car (which I assume is what you meant by “automotive”) tires come in Standard Load (SL) and Extra Load (XL), and they don’t come in Load Ranges (as in C, D, E, etc.) If a tire dealer is installing non-ST tires on trailers, he is either installing passenger car tires (typically SL), or LT tires. - and since 13", 14" and 15" LT tires are pretty scarce, I’m betting he is using P type tires - and I hope he has done the math. This could get really expensive for him if one fails.

“Actually, No! ST tires are built similar to LT tires, and STRONGER than passenger car tires.”

ST tires may have a higher load capacity than passenger cars or light trucks but they are still illegal to use on passenger vehicles just as LT tires are. I was referring to LT tires mainly when I made my comment and that’s why I mentioned “usually” in my statement. I worked in the RV business for many years and rarely saw an ST tire on any trailer or travel trailer on our lot. I guess they were available as a special order but their construction is still not as strong as a passenger car or light truck tire. Another limiting factor with ST tires is that Industry standards dictate tires with the ST designation are speed rated to 65 MPH (104 km/h) under normal inflation and load conditions. Good point though @CapriRacer …although a little weak (slight chuckle).

I continue to use the terminology that I learned back in the ‘good ole days,’ @CapriRacer. It seems more ligical.

“E” was once called 10 ply rating…“D” would be 8-ply rating, “C” was 6ply…So just match the expected load with the capacity of the tires, which is molded on the sidewall…Moving up to 225/75R/15 should solve a lot of his problems…