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Kudos to Mazda and these dealerships!

“Six New Jersey Mazda dealerships, with a seventh in the middle of the application process, are offering free oil changes and enhanced cleaning services for U.S. health care workers as part of the Essential Car Care program announced by Mazda North American Operations.”

:+1:

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Is that just for the one’s that own Mazda’s or all the health care worker’s regardless of what they own?

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Any vehicle qualifies, with a few exceptions (exotics, off-roaders, and anything that requires special care and feeding).

This is a nationwide program, btw.

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That is good of them for doing that. Maybe other’s will follow their lead.

I guess I’m too cynical to buy into things like this. I suspect the real reason is not to help someone so much as it is to keep their name in front of them so they will come back and buy another car.

I’ve worked for a few dealers who did things like this in the past (not regarding COVID19) and it was a PR move to convince people it was car trading time. In some cases (seriously) it was “Why spend all of that money on a a 30k miles maintenance when we can make you a deal on a new car right now”.
In another case they were telling a guy whose VW had 22k miles on it that he really needed to unload it.

Hard to believe car sales people are full of it I know. :wink:

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Not car sale’s people say it isn’t so.

The last bastion of truth in America…

Eh. So what if it is? They aren’t gonna buy it now - they’re either laid off or too busy dealing with patients to mess with buying a car. And if after things settle down, they need a car and they have friendly feelings toward Mazda, that’s OK, because they still got a leg up when needed.

The idea that good acts have to be completely altruistic is kind of bizarre. Everyone does everything because of what it will do for them. Even the most saintly person you can think of, when he does something nice for someone it’s because it makes him feel good. We’re a transactional species primarily motivated by what will best enhance our own quality of life (even if that enhancement is feeling good about enhancing others’ quality of life), and that’s not gonna go away just because we invented money.

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+1
The bottom line–no matter what Mazda’s motivation might be–is that healthcare workers are being given a free service at a time when they are incredibly stressed and need to feel that their efforts are appreciated.

Nancy Reagan used to advise that people “just say no” to drugs, and if any of those healthcare workers feel that they are being pressured to buy a Mazda, I’m sure that most–if not all of them–have the ability to “say no”.

That service will be free of charge whether they say yes or no to the purchase of a new Mazda, and to assume that they would be dumb enough to buy a vehicle that they don’t want or need because of Mazda’s largess is–IMHO–insulting to those healthcare workers.

On a related topic…

Subaru of America has given enough money to Feeding America to buy 50 million meals for hungry Americans. Are we to believe that those meals are being distributed by Feeding America along with Subaru sales brochures? Are we to think that people who can’t afford to feed their family are–miraculously–expected to be new car purchasers anytime in the near future?

Can’t any corporations do something in the public interest without everyone assuming that they are doing it for less than charitable reasons?
:thinking:

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Nice way to pick customers that are working, not a charity move or it would be offered to the recently unemployed, cynical me :frowning:

How in the world could a corporate entity–be it Mazda of America or any other company–be able to reliably identify “the recently unemployed”?

In NYC, the municipal authorities are distributing MREs to needy people who are actually near starvation. However, even this government entity is unable to determine who is truly in need of that type of assistance, so they are relying on the personal moral codes of people, in the hope that those who are not actually “in need” will not take advantage of the situation.

I know a guy in NYC who does NOT need charity, but who lined-up for the “free food” simply because it was free. Because he did not like the appearance of the free food that he did not actually need, he chose to throw it away, instead of passing it on to someone who might have needed it, who would not have been as “picky”, and who REALLY needed sustenance.

Hmmmm…
:thinking:

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I don’t know what Mazda’s intentions are. There are a lot of companies that are doing some good, but I think for the most part, it is a waste. We have a lot of physicians and employees that are nowhere close to the “front” of the line, essentially on extension vacation with pay because their departments are closed. Seems like they are the ones in line for their free latte, donuts, etc. The rest of us have no time for this, working 12+ hr shifts. I think they are just abusing the system. I think our nurses and therapists are one of the hardest working people I have seen. All they want right now is enough PPE’s. One person out sick as I am writing this.

I don’t see myself cutting the line at Costco or anywhere else. I am 6 ft tall, able bodied, there are expectant moms, old folks in line.

We are trying to do our share, ordering food from local mom and pop restaurants as much as possible. Needless to say, my diet is not as good as it used to be.

… and we also have a lot of people like my closest friend, who typically works 14-16 hour shifts as a Critical Care nurse, and who then has to go through a very long and detailed decontamination procedure after leaving work. He is exhausted to the breaking point.

Nor do I.
As a Senior Citizen, I go to Costco only during their “senior hours” (T,W,R 8-9 AM) when it is not very busy.

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Just saying it is being offered to working people, not need based.

I once had a few dealerships ask me repeatedly to become part of the sales staff… After several customers were kind enough to relay what a pleasant and informative employee (who did not work for them) they had in the guy that handed them their keys back. It got to the point where one manager insisted he be within earshot of the key handover so he could hear and understand what all the hubbub was about after he got yet another positive report about this mystery employee he had. lol.

All I did was honestly and frankly walk customers through their alarm system or remote starter that I had just installed and explained the system in very precise detail so that they understood fully what was what and sometimes how it was even incorporated into the vehicle (wiring wise). I had no training in this, I was just being myself and covering what, I felt, was important to know. The manager said I would be a top salesman without question and he made repeated offers every time he knew I would be onsite. I never took him up on his sales offers but…I did tell him that I had been repairing and selling motorcycles and cars for many years by that time and had a lot of customer facing experience so to speak. I also found it very easy to sell almost always. The secret, I told him, was to know what you are talking about in very fine detail, no need for lies or exaggerations because you don’t know your stuff and yet feel the need to continue talking at all cost…people usually get a feel for when the BS is flowing, even when they dont know the specifics of the topic…its a feeling that is transferred somehow. He just laughed at me a little on that one. I told him I was telling the truth and that I knew he believed that I was.

I think this might be true about anything really. I don’t know where they get some of these sales people or why they think they can make up the silly stuff that they do about all sorts of subjects…it seems to stem from ignorance, I dunno. Why am I even talking about this subject right now? I just lost myself… lol.

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So, as a retired person who is not “working”, I shouldn’t be able to avail myself of that service?
Just saying…

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I don’t care for businesses that donate to charity or do do other “giving” promotions. At my northern outpost a local bank is always in the local newspaper for doing such stuff and taking credit for it. Where’d they get the money for this? The money is money that should have gone to their customers. They pay almost no interest on savings accounts and I believe that money they save gets donated.

My local rural “cooperative” utility likes to give away money, too. Where’d they get it? They give money for “scholarships” and many of the recipients just happen to be employees kids or summer employees.

My state confiscates money from customers in the form of some kind of low income fund. My northern electric bill has such a “surcharge” every month. It’s so nice of them to be so generous with my money.

Going through life I donate to causes I feel deserve the money. I really believe that businesses and governments shouldn’t be doing it. There are organizations and churches that fill that void.

I’ve found it’s best when everybody pays for their own stuff. But, then again, I’ve never made for a good communist, taking a hit for the common good.
CSA
:palm_tree: :sunglasses: :palm_tree:

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Go put your life at risk along with these health care workers and take advantage of this service.

I am not saying don’t go in for an oil change, for the free service you need to have a job you are working at, and thus a potential car buyer.
“offering free oil changes and enhanced cleaning services for U.S. health care workers”

I have no intention of doing that.
I was speaking… in theory… in regard to Barkydog’s assertion that this should only be available to “working people”.