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Keeping spray can nozzles clean

I got around to painting the pickup because I was renovating the kitchen and bathroom so may as well paint the pickup when I’m painting stuff - the bicycle has some chips out of it too, and the bottom of the dryer rusted, and there’s some spots on the oven and fridge…

I hate dealing with clogged nozzles, spraying out excess paint to clear the nozzle, ending up with a can of spray paint that has paint but no propellant, so I take the nozzles off and keep them in a jar of mineral spirits. An ounce does for all 6 I have out. I get a little bit of mineral spirits when I start using the nozzle.

6 Likes

Good tip thank you

When you’re finished painting, turn the can upside down and spray until sir comes out. This seems to always clear the nozzle for the next time.

Most cans of spray paint recommend this tactic. It doesn’t always work for me, wastes paint, both by spraying some merely to clear the nozzle and by using propellant to clear the nozzle but not deliver paint, which can leave the can with paint in it but no propellant. I may have this problem when others don’t because I use small quantities. A can may have enough propellant for the average user who uses paint in larger quantities, therefore fewer episodes, which isn’t enough paint for the user who sprays in smaller quantities and more episodes.

Nozzles in solvent is a useful trick, and it works, but honestly spray paint is supposed to be used up fully. It doesn’t exactly have the best or highest quality valving or nozzles to be used as one sees fit and or as needed over long periods of time. So the next best tip is to simply use it up as soon as you “crack” it.

Yes, but that’s not how I need to use paint.