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Installing after market Navigation system to an 2015 RX350

Hi everyone,

I want to install an after market Navigation system to the 2015 RX350 but could not find the manufacture part number of the Navigation system for the 2015 model or if the previous year Navigation models (2012, 2013, 2014) would be compatible with the 2015 RX350?

I thought in theory, all one would need is, installing the GPS antenna and a GPS software + (possibly update the GUI) into the current hard drive; assuming there is a connection for the GPS antenna in the back of the non-Navigation console. Wonder if anyone know if this is doable? This would be the best and least expensive option, or

Would I need to buy an entirely new 2015 RX350 Navigation console? Or, would 2012, 2013, or 2014 console compatible? i.e. Lexus has not changed the part (the Navigation console) between these model year?

Greatly appreciate your help (hopefully I figure this out before my wife realize that I bought her an expensive new car without a Navigation system. (Note: My dilemma is that she does not like the tangled-wire or a separate handheld/portable Gamin or Tomtom navigation “thingy”!)

Thank you for your input and advice

For the price of an airline ticket, I’ll send you my wife.

“Why are you going this way”, “Turn left here” (as you’re in the middle of the intersection), Look out for that truck", “You’re going to fast”

Then you’d wish you were lost.

Yosemite

This may more complex than you think, the radio can be integrated into several different systems. I will look for a wiring diagram later today. The model number of the radio should be printed on the face of the radio in fine print. You will also have a small heart attack when you see the pricing on the factory radios $1000 or more.

I have two thoughts here. 1. Do not do anything that might cause future warranty problems. 2. A smart phone app might do what you want through the radio.

I agree with Steve and Volvo.

Just curious, is there something about the navigation functionality that a smart phone provides that isn’t meeting your needs?

+1 to Steve and Volvo… Let the phones nav data talk through the radio. There should be an over-ride for phone audio.

You description of how to update might work on a desktop computer but not on a car. It is unlikely there is a “hard drive” in the conventional sense. There may not be an operating system either. Likely there is a solid state memory in the nav system runing dedicated integral code and it is protected from interference from people just like you (no offense). Car makers don’t want you inside their boxes.

You can buy integrated navigation systems if you do a search but they are dang near the same price as a factory unit. There is a reason they charge a couple thousand. I’d take it back to the dealer and have them install it or swap for one with the Nav system.

Worth checking with the dealer, but they may ask big $$$, or refuse. I’d use my phone.

I’d get a TomTom or Garmin to take with you, or the smart phone app idea. The cost difference between the model you have and the model with satnav was probably less than paying the dealership to install…or fix…a factory replacement unit.

I took a quick look on the ewd, it does not look it would be hard to install an aftermarket system. The climate control and multi display do connect to the radio but I believe they will work without the radio.

Navigation is another overrated thing in the car. I put a system in my car, mainly for the rearview camera and bluetooth and the nav is pretty much not used. The one on my phone is fine if I needed one. If you have bluetooth and rearview camera, then invest in a good phone stand.

A lot can depend upon your tolerance for financial pain. If you install a Navigation system, or have it done, then any warranty repairs in the future can be legitimately denied if any electrical issues crop up that are related in any way, shape, or form to that installation; directly or indirectly.

I remember while working for VW a buyer of a brand new GTI chose to install a new stereo himself as he preferred the aftermarket over the original and did not like the dealer price.
The car was 2 weeks old when it was towed in with a burnt wiring smell.

I was the unfortunate soul who had to replace the instrument panel wire harness which was fried due to the incorrect connection of one single wire; and at the ticked off car owner’s expense. The fuses kept popping and the guy kept upping the amperage rating. At some point the fuse held and the wiring surrendered.
Shouldn’t have grounded a power antenna lead… :frowning:

Since it’s a brand new car, I strongly suggest letting the dealer do it. Otherwise, if you should start having electrical problems, you just might end up with your warranty coverage voided.

I too could never understand the need for this stuff in a car, what with all the other nav systems available that don’t need to be wired in, but if that’s what the man wants, who am I to judge?

In the higher end cars like that, it’s almost cheaper to sell your car and get one that came with navigation. In my Acura, which is older and probably less sophisticated than your Lexus, the navi-computer is integrated with the radio, the ECU, the climate control, and probably a bunch of other systems that I’m not even aware of. Trying to transplant it into an Acura that didn’t come with navigation would involve so much surgery and re-wiring that it would make a lot more sense to get rid of the car and get one with navigation.

My personal recommendation for cars that don’t have navigation built in is to get an Android smart phone and use its navigation capabilities. Your map will be updated faster than the maps in that Lexus anyway. :wink:

The thing is his wife expects the nav system and she doesn’t want a garmin. He just didn’t want to spend the money for it and she doesn’t know it yet.

It just depends on how much traveling you do. I like the built in system because of the bigger screen and can check weather and so on while driving. My wife likes the Garmin for its ease and restaurant info and so on, so we actually use both. It is really helpful going through places like Chicago.

“Since it’s a brand new car, I strongly suggest letting the dealer do it. Otherwise, if you should start having electrical problems, you just might end up with your warranty coverage voided.”

+1 to mountainbike’s and ok4450’s advice in this regard.

The long-term members of this forum will probably recall the case of a young woman who had an aftermarket audio system installed on her brand-new Honda CR-V by a so-called “professional installer”. When her wiring harness melted as a result of a hack job by the installer, she was surprised and upset that Honda disallowed warranty coverage for this repair and also gave indications that future problems might not be covered by warranty coverage.

Of course, Honda was correct about denying warranty coverage, and I cannot imagine somebody with a new vehicle trying to save a few bucks by allowing anybody other than the dealership to do a job like this. That new car warranty is potentially worth…thousands…of dollars, and trying to save a few hundred $$ on installing audio or navigation equipment just makes very little economic sense.

IMHO, you can’t afford to save money in this way.

Toyota,Lexus and Scion new vehicles all come with the E-Tune systems. They are your radio, but with integration into some of the vehicles systems. Backup camera…Engine monitoring…GPS…etc…etc. The list is pretty extensive.

If you replace the ETune system with an aftermarket system then you’ll loose some functionality. You have to decide if those features are worth it.

With cell phones now having GPS built in…that’s all I’ve been using for the past 5 years.

The long-term members of this forum will probably recall the case of a young woman who had an aftermarket audio system installed on her brand-new Honda CR-V by a so-called "professional installer". When her wiring harness melted as a result of a hack job by the installer, she was surprised and upset that Honda disallowed warranty coverage for this repair and also gave indications that future problems might not be covered by warranty coverage.

Today’s aftermarket systems are plug and play. There’s no need for wire splicing. All you do is get the right wire harness. So chances of wires melting is very unlikely.

“Today’s aftermarket systems are plug and play. There’s no need for wire splicing. All you do is get the right wire harness. So chances of wires melting is very unlikely.”

…and yet, the “professional” installer did cut and splice wires incorrectly, thus producing major problems for this woman.

Perhaps if the OP got a written estimate from the dealer and showed it to the wife she’d want the Garmin instead…