I am feeling ripped off


#1

I always take my car to the dealer when I need repairs because I trust the diagnosis, and I never feel like I am being ripped off. This time I had to take it to the nearest mechanic because it was over-heating. Turns out I went for all the “recommended” repairs, because per my conversation with the mechanic this is what I understood “needed” to be done (I figured this out after reading my paperwork). Then I get there to pick up my car and suddenly my battery is not working and I need to buy a new one. really?? Ok, well, I go home and pop the hood and I swear my OLD radiator is still in my car even though I payed to completely replace it, among other things. I ended up spending $1,500 and am feeling ripped off. How can I prove it??? Feeling frustrated! At least my car is working again…


#2

Dealers some times are on a par costwise for an independent mechanic. was it on your receipt from the mechanic that the radiator was replaced? if you can post details on the receipt from the mechanic, that would possibly clear some confusion.


#3

Have you talked to the repair shop ? If not don’t wait to long . If you do not get a satisfactory answer you may be forced to pay another shop to examine the work the invoice lists.


#4

@vail girl
Wish I was at Vail right now… anyhow…

Have you Googled this shop or have you done any checking on them?
Sometimes bad shops are just one trip to court away from losing their license. When customers find out they willing to reconsider.

What is your state’s procedure, as per the Department of Motor Vehicles or Secretary of State’s procedure for initiating a complaint or asking for arbitration? A computer search should help with this.

Do the mechanics in your state have to have certifications and print their mechanic number on your repair order?

Another mechanic at another shop could be willing to check it out and give a professional affidavit.

CSA


#5

Study the invoice carefully to see if it actually says R&R Radiator, and on the parts list, instead of maybe radiator flush. But it should be fairly evident if a new one is in there or not.


#6

@vail girl
"Ok, well, I go home and pop the hood and I swear my OLD radiator is still in my car even though I payed to completely replace it, among other things."

It could be there…

…Just a thought, but on most cars the radiator is difficult to see. It is usually concealed from view by a plate above it and an A/C condenser in front of it and a radiator fan shroud in back that is not part of a new radiator, but rather removed and put on the new radiator.

I know this because I have installed radiators.

Make of car/vehicle?
Model?
Model-Year?


CSA


#7

Hi @“common sense answer” I have a 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee. My radiator is easily visible and when I look at it now it is super dirty as it was before, and the bolts to hold it in place look old and dirty like before.


#8

Hi @Bing thank you for your reply. Yes, it says R&R radiator and including labor cost me $675 just for this part.


#9

How many stars on Yelp? $675 is a bit high for parts + labor, but not crazy high, IF it was needed.


#10

Take plenty of photographs and contact a lawyer.


#11

The radiator is not easy to see on that vehicle, the front is blocked by the air conditioning condenser and the engine side is covered by the radiator fans and shroud. Below is a diagram of the view through the front.


#12

I agree that OP may in fact be looking at the dirty old ac condenser, and not the radiator


#13

Is this what it looks like?


#14

@“vail girl” Don’t feel bad. I traded with the same independent shop foaiore than 20 years. About a year ago, the manager changed. I think I was overcharged for an unnecessary repair on one vehicle. It seemed as though for the last year when I would bring one of my cars in for an oil change, I would get a call that there was something else that needed attention. The last time I was there I was told my vehicle needed new struts. I declined. I took the vehicle home and crawled under and I couldn’t see that the struts were leaking. I also did the bounce test and the struts seemed fine. Not long after that I had a tire that kept losing air, so I went to my independent tire store. I asked that shop to check the struts and was told my struts were fine. The tire shop also replaced a grease seal. I was told that there was no charge since I purchased the tires from them. For the next oil change, I went to the dealer. The dealer also checked the struts and gave them the o.k. I feel bad because I had gone to this independent shop for years and when I was working I depended on them to keep my cars in shape. I had recommended the shop to friends. When I was younger, I did a lot of my own work by necessity. I should have picked up sooner what was happening. I just chalked it up to experience.


#15

Hi @Nevada_545 maybe I’m confused as to what the radiator is?? Ok, now you got me googling and I feel really dumb! I assumed the radiator was the “coolant reservoir,” but I guess this is something separate. I feel relieved. Thank you for your help!!


#16

Do you know somebody who knows a bit about cars, to take a look?


#17

This why I suggested asking the shop to explain what they did .


#18

No worries VG. You probably got your radiator replaced like they say. It’s not overheating, right? So that’s a good sign. Replacing a radiator is pretty simple job and very easy to tell if it was done or not by another mechanic – unlike some other kinds of repairs which would require a lot of effort and expense to verify they were done – so there would be little to gain for a shop to not do it then tell you they did.

I had sort of the opposite problem one time. A dealership shop told me they didn’t replace a part, when they did! One has to roll with the punches in the auto repair game I guess …lol


#19

CSA Said:
“It could be there…
…Just a thought, but on most cars the radiator is difficult to see. It is usually concealed from view by a plate above it and an A/C condenser in front of it and a radiator fan shroud in back that is not part of a new radiator, but rather removed and put on the new radiator.”

vail girl Said:
“Hi @common sense answer I have a 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee. My radiator is easily visible and when I look at it now it is super dirty as it was before, and the bolts to hold it in place look old and dirty like before.”

Wait… What? Catch me up, here. It turned out the radiator wasn’t easily viewed and very likely was replaced?
CSA


#20

Trust seems to be the hardest thing to find when it comes to vehicles.