Hyundai 4 cylinders with high milage


#1

Should I consider either an elantra or sonata with 4 cylinder engine and 80-90,000 miles? With the price of used cars, these are the only ones I am finding reasonable. also can a 6 cylinder be installed in a car that had a 4 cylinder or does the trans need to be altered as well/


#2

I don’t have a problem with 80-90k miles used cars at all. That’s what I always buy and it lets the original owner eat that depreciation.

The car always depends on how the original owner drove it, maintained it, and how thorough a checkover is done before purchase. I’ve seen 150k cars that were like new both mechanically and aesthetically and 25k miles cars that should be hauled off to the crusher.

Forget an engine conversion. It can be done but it is not cost effective, transmission or not. Wiring harness, ECM, throttle linkage, etc, etc, would all have to be swapped out and unless you do it yourself it’s just not economically practical. And maybe not even then.


#3

The Elantra would be an excellent choice. The Sonata, on the other hand, I wouldn’t buy with the 4 cylinder engine. The good news is the Sonata does come equipped with a V6 on some models, and are just as readily available, although they cost a little bit more. I’ve got a 2002 Accent and a 99 Sonata V6, and they are both good cars, the Accent especially so. The Sonata’s had problems over the years with various sensors going, and right now one of the rear struts aren’t working right, but other than that, it’s been decent. Anyway, I’d probably choose the Elantra, as it gives a good combination of efficiency, power and space. And, according to what I’ve read, the Elantra is quite reliable.


#4

Assuming the car you are considering has been properly maintained there should be no problem. There is nothing inherently wrong with Hyundai engines or vehicles, and many of them are lasting to 200K miles or more.

Timing belt replacement is critical on these 4-cylinder engines, so if there is no proof that the belt has been replaced, assume you will have to do it as soon as you purchase the car.

You cannot swap a V6 into a car that originally had a 4. Forget that idea.


#5
There is nothing wrong with a car that has 100,000 miles on it.  Unless it has been abused (like not maintained) it should have another 100,000 miles or more to go. 

I would not consider the engine swap.  It is possible but it would not be cost effective.  Were you thinking that any car with 100,000 miles would need a new engine?  Heck no.

#6

If you are trying to save money, and want a resonably reliable car, buy an Elantra; the engine has enough pep for all normal driving. I would avoid the V6 Sonata, since it is not easy on gas, and much more expensive to service than a 4 cylinder. Several of my friends have Elantras and are very impressed with the reliability. Since Huyndai wants be a major force in the North American market, they have a good record of stocking parts. Servicing an Elantra should cost no more than a Honda and a lot less than a Volkwagen Golf.


#7

Timing belt replacement is critical on these 4-cylinder engines, so if there is no proof that the belt has been replaced, assume you will have to do it as soon as you purchase the car.

Which might be part of the reason these cars are for sale. Some owners think that the $500+ for replacing the TB/WP is absurd, and refuse to change it. Then they get the shock of a lifetime when the car dies when the belt snaps.

You cannot swap a V6 into a car that originally had a 4. Forget that idea.

You can, but the cost would be ridiculous. Take a look at the Solstice/sky, they’re normally equipped with 4cyl. engines, but, a company is producing some v-8 swaps for them: http://www.mallettcars.com/solstice-conversion.htm