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How to make any car.. ... "LOOK WET"

You keep making this reference as if it validates your position. That plane is also traveling at 10x your ground speed in a car. This has as much relevance as putting a rear wing on your car, like they have on race cars going 200+ mph, when yours typically <70mph. The benefits are unmeasureable.

What is the reason why the “workers” choose not to sleep in a tent at -50? You have a car, it can’t be a financial issue. Is it to be macho?

It should be no surprise that people who have never needed to extract salt from sea ice and probably never will, wouldn’t know how to do it. It isn’t some measure of intelligence that a 3 year old that must do this to survive has this knowledge passed down and can do it while most others cannot. Frankly, given the choice of sleeping out on sea ice at 50 below and extracting drinking water from sea ice versus walking southward until I didn’t have to do that is a no brainer…

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Yup!
It’s time to activate the “ignore” feature.
:+1:

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If it only works at extremely high altitudes

Please explain how it works on your car at sea level .

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You have no idea how airplanes work. The plane is more efficient at high altitudes because jet engines are more efficient at high altitudes. If anything, the wash/wax job is more important at low altitudes because there are more air molecules to run into.

And while you’re correct that clean, slick paint will improve mileage, it won’t be “very noticeable” at the pump or to your wallet.

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First you state how you get your car to shine then you say how you live mile’s out on a frozen ocean then you say how the kid get’s fresh water an put’s it on a wood stove. how do you get your car out there with no gas station’s and where doe’s the wood come from for the stove and how doe’s the stove keep from melting into the ice ? I do know for a fact tree’s do not grow that far north unless you have magic tree’s that can live in a frozen ocean I am glad that I wear boot’s because it is defiantly getting deep around here.

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Nothing you have said applies to the real world. Absolutely nothing and now it’s conspiracy theories.

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I’m saying that in regards to proper paint care. It’s not recommended by anyone (other that you) to clean a car in method that you’re describing. What you’re describing is pretty horrible for the paint. Water alone doesn’t encapsulate dirt, not does it provide enough lubricity to be safe for to wipe down the paint without scratching it. Auto shampoo/car wash soap is a requirement. I find it incredible that your telling people to just use a wet towel/t-shirt to wipe down a dirty car. And then go on to say to not take your car to a car wash because that’ll scratch your paint and/or cause swirls. Most modern car washes doesn’t use brushes any more and haven’t for 20 years or so. They are far more gentle than they used to be. However wiping a dirty car with a moist towel will cause more scratches and swirls than any modern car wash will.

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I find the discussion of this guy’s way of life much more interesting . . . versus the discussion as to how to make the car look wet

As for me, if I want my car to look wet, I’ll just drive it during a rainstorm

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Click on Majkimaje’s avatar and you will see he has been banned.

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There is one thing that can affect fuel mileage and is seldom mentioned or even thought of I suppose and that is barometric pressure which varies constantly. It would be impossible to say that mileage improved because of one thing when it could be that the reason is a pressure drop.

Over the years and during many trips to the mountains of CO and the thin air my cars have usually averaged around 1.5 to 2 MPG increase even while pulling grades and running on 85 octane.
Dirty, clean, or dragging along 50 pounds of frozen slush made no difference…

I am only responding now because @Majikmaje has besmirched my knowledge of aviation, despite my 20 years of experience working in the field.

If it was going to make a difference, it would be at low altitude, not high altitude. There is much less drag at high altitude, that is why airlines like to fly as high as they are allowed to.

I also suspect that what the OP thought was a liquid wax used by FedEx was actually Turco. It is a cleaner that is really nasty, but it cleans like nothing else and getting the deeply embedded dirt out of the paint is critical to reducing corrosion and extending the life of the aircraft.

Darn I was curious how to get salt out of frozen sea ice.

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He sort of answered that in his response to me above. The 3-year-old kid doesn’t actually do anything to remove the salt. He just sits back and watches as natural processes work (assuming they do work in the short amount of time the OP suggests).

Well you have to admit it’s been some interesting reading anyway. Nothing like “my car won’t start, will washing it help?”. High tales and misdemeanors I guess.

When you freeze salt water, the salt stays in the brine and the ice itself is fresh water. This also works for alcohol and water. You can “freeze distill” wine or beer by putting it in the freezer until it becomes an ice slurry, drain off the liquid and end up with a higher alcohol concentration in the decanted liquid.
Many chemists are familiar with the purification technique known as recrystallization. The pure substance forms crystals and the impurities remain in the liquid.
So all you need to do to get fresh water out of sea ice, is to simply melt it.

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WHAT?? ARE YOU SERIOUS?? You’re the one who started insulting people…and now you’re sick of it? Give me a break little boy.

I slept outside with no tents for a few weeks in Nam…Slightly more dangerous.

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@cdaquila Could this be closed please since the Op has been banned .

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+1
Absolutely!

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Face Palm! Uhmm, it takes less energy to desalinate sea water than it does to freeze that same water in the Saudi desert. Takes about 10-13 Watt-hrs to desalinate on gallon of water. Takes more than 350 Watt-hrs to make a gallon of water into ice depending on ambient temperature and the efficiency of the vessel’s insulation. With a COP of 4-5, this means it takes 70 to 85 Watt-hrs to make that ice. Or, worst case, 5.5 times the energy to desalinate with ice.

And I still have NO idea why you even brought this up except to exercise some bit of knowledge none of us have to make yourself feel superior.

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