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How to fix "Wrong Key Fob" error? 2013 Ram 1500

Five years ago I purchased a used Ram 1500 from a local dealership and for the first year or so, it ran great with no issues. About a year into the purchase, the truck system out of the blue stopped recognizing my key fob (flashing a “Wrong Key Fob” error). I couldn’t start the vehicle at all… so i ended up getting the vehicle towed to the dealership where they re-flashed the key and said it was just an odd error. Two years later, out of the blue, the same exact issue happened, and repeat… I ended up having to pay again for a tow and fix at the dealership. About a year ago, I had the issue occur to me a third time. In this instance, my truck was stranded about 200 miles from home, with a trailer, resulting in a high-expense tow and, again, a trip to the dealership to “fix” the issue.

This time around, the dealership said that the error was due to an aftermarket auto-start that had been installed on the vehicle, and removed the autostart. What I am concerned about, however, is a possible FOURTH instance, and the fact that I feel like i can’t trust this vehicle. I have had the error flash at me several times in the last month (before finally starting on the second or third attempt). I am wondering if there is any way to bypass the fob recognition altogether? Thanks for the help as I am at the end of my rope but don’t feel like selling this vehicle to some unsuspecting person to have to deal with this issue later.

As someone who’s had his share of weird issues with Dodge key fobs… I have a few thoughts.

First, have you every replaced the original fob or fobs you’re using today? I wonder if the original fobs have somehow gone bad, or periodically go bad. A brand new fob or fobs might make a world of difference.

Also, I’d suggest using a locksmith to add, delete, or program any fobs. Dealers are usually a lot more expensive than a local locksmith, though I know sometimes options can be limited.

Finally…does your truck have an actual door lock that uses a metal key stored in the fob? If so, I’d suggest having a spare metal key made (locksmith), and store it somewhere on the outside of the truck. That way you can always at least get into the vehicle if the fob acts up.

Personally I hate these new fobs. Metal keys always worked just fine for me. Good luck.

New ???

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I love them. Wife has one one her 2007 Lexus. Only issue we had is every now and then you need to replace the battery. Outside of that…no issues.

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Personally, I don’t care whether I open a car door with a key fob or a metal key as long as whatever system is used works. I don’t care if I have pushbutton start with the key remaining in my pocket or I have to put the key in the ignition switch and step down on the floor mounted starter pedal. Either system beats the magneto hand crank system to start the International Harvester F-12 tractor as I did for a farmer I worked for.
I do like indoor plumbing, but I am perfectly capable of pulling a flush handle as opposed to modern commercial restrooms where the flushing is automatically done for me. Both my son and my brother have refrigerators with ice makers and both have had problems with the ice makers. I don’t have a problem filling and emptying ice cube trays.
What I am wondering is how much some of these modern features are worthwhile if they aren’t reliable. I would bet the OP would gladly trade the key fob system for a metal key.

Remote vehicle entry device has many good points and we have had them since 1993 with out problems .
Good points :
Allow people to unlock their vehicle before they get to it and possibly see if there is a person in it that should not be
Most of the FOB’s have a Panic Button that just might prevent an assault
Ability to open doors and trunk when raining before you actually get to vehicle
Not sure where the vehicle is in a crowded parking lot the horn can be activated for direction to look

The ice maker is almost always the most problem-prone part on a modern refrigerator. When I was shopping for my current refrigerator in 2005, I indicated the one that I wanted to the salesman at Best Buy. He insisted on trying to figure out how to operate the automatic ice dispenser on that model–which actually lacked that feature. I allowed him to make a fool of himself for a couple of minutes, before I revealed to him that this particular model did not have that feature.

He then began the purchase process, including the obligatory “you better buy the aftermarket extended warranty” spiel. I declined, and have had no problems whatsoever with my LG refrigerator in the last 15 years.

@VDCdriver. I am certain that it is obvious to you and the others on this board that I am a full fledged Geezer.
If some new technology really makes my life easier or more comfortable, or more enjoyable, I am in favour of it. For instance, the houses in which I grew up until I was in 4th grade had manually controlled coal heat. It was really great when we got a gas heating permit and my Dad had a gas conversion burner installed in the furnace that was controlled with a thermostat. However, I don’t need an app on my smartphone to remotely turn up.the heat in my house when I am on my way home. I can manually turn up the thermostat and wait 5 minutes for the house to warm up.
The headlights on my Sienna turn on automatically when headlights are needed and off when not needed. I think I am smart enough to turn the lights on at sundown and off at sun up.

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