Happy Father’s Day to Everyone


#1

Thank you for being great Car Talk friends, too!

Enjoy your day :blush:


#2

:roll_eyes:


#3

We started early. My daughter works this afternoon, and the official event was brunch. I increased my popularity by serving Sunday Morning Stout, very popular among my children, and me, of course. All the girls brought something, but the best treat was getting them all together at the same time.


#4

I’ll be inside since it’s going to approach 100 degrees today. Son is 800 miles away anyway.


#5

I hope he calls. I’m lucky my children still live close by.


#6

I am happy for y’all that will get to see your kid’s & grandkid’s today. Mine are too far away to get to see in person as I live in Ga. & they live in Faiirbanks Alaska.


#7

I’m not a father

And my own father is long deceased

So it’ll be just another day

Glad to hear some of you other guys are having a nice day

:smiley:


#8

My boys took me to lunch yesterday. I guess I should not call them boys at 46 and 50 years old.


#9

Happy Father’s Day to all the dads. I called mine. To make this at all on topic, he just got trained to drive a mail truck. He says the visibility is terrible, in quite colorful terms.


#10

Do you happen to know what kind of mail truck . . . usps has used several different models over the years

Anyways, the ones that are “based on” the S-10 and Explorer platforms are nothing but blind spot.

I can somewhat sympathize, because some of our fleet’s vehicles . . . especially the box “vans” and cargo transport vehicles are just as bad, and bigger, unless your dad’s driving a tractor trailer

Oh, I went to visit my dad at the cemetery today. It’s a large one occupying countless acres of property, and you can drive your vehicle through, to reach the gravesites. Anyways, there’s a new sign up, which limits speed to 25mph. If you’re the kind of person that has to be TOLD to drive slowly through a cemetery, where people are paying their respects, then there’s probably something seriously wrong with you. And I don’t apologize for being harsh as far as that’s concerned. I drove slowly, even before they put up signs.

Business is clearly doing well. The landscaping crew now has brand new John Deere equipment.


#11

No kids and dad passed away in '96. He is buried in Ohio and I am in Florida so visiting the grave site.

Happy Fathers day to all the dads here.


#12

I looked it up, because to my untrained eye it’s an aluminum box…but you’re right - it’s based on an S-10. Never would have guessed.


#13

My Dad lived from 1904 to 2001. He really saw the automobile and the highway system develop. The first car he drove was a Model T Ford that his parents owned. He didn’t see the need to own a car until 1938 when he bought a new Chevrolet. He was always optimistic. My brother and I learned a lot from Dad’s work ethic and he taught us how to do a lot of things ourselves. I was blessed to have him as long as I did.


#14

Oh boy, after doing a little research on those Grumman mail trucks, I think I’m going to have double the Christmas bonus for my guy. I had no idea they were that bad. Interesting was the sign on the dash to avoid backing whenever possible. I even thought they were front wheel drive.

A couple years ago it had snowed and our bay hadn’t been plowed yet. I saw the postal carrier walking around the bay instead of driving. When I talked to him he said he was just afraid he would get stuck so decided to walk the route. Now I understand why he was afraid of getting stuck. No snow tires, rear wheel drive, plus the front wheels are narrower than the rear which means the rear won’t follow in the same track as the front. I was told this was an issue with EMTs driving ambulances where they have dual rear wheels driving in the snow.

At any rate my hat is off to folks who drive these things.


#15

Jerry van Dyke’s mother was a car.


#16

In my neck of the woods, they put tire chains on the rear tires of all the mail vehicles when there is a forecast of snow, so if they don’t do it in your area, I’m somewhat surprised. I guess that it probably comes down to local management.