GM Recalls


#1

We’ve had the discussion concerning GM recalls and getting notice of them. Rather than dredge up an old thread, I thought it was interesting that I got a notice from GM today in the mail on my 2009 Pontiac. They have extended the warranty on the TPS for 10 years 120,000 miles for a possible faulty TPS. Mine is fine. So I don’t understand how others do not receive notices if they keep their registration address current. Obviously GM is still standing behind issues as they are found even for discontinued car lines.


#2

Second and third owners aren’t always in the database. We were the first owners of the 3 GM cars we own and have been getting recall notices for them. I think they finally replaced the ignition on the Cobalts. We didn’t have a problem with the ignitions turning off, but I told my daughters to lighten the load on the key chain from the day they started driving any car. I did notice binding on the 2009 Cobalt electric steering when the youngest practiced parallel parking, but at no other time. That was fixed on their dime, too.


#3

Yes, GM seems to be pretty good about addressing problems when they are discovered. I’m hearing that its becoming common for them to even notify the owner of a problem that’s been discovered, but a fix hasn’t been determined. I guess that is to alert the owner to exercise caution using that feature, when possible.


#4

Recalls are mandated by the Federal Government. Unfortunately if cars change hands, GM loses the address, so the owner has to take the initiative and go to his dealer who will check whether there is a recall on the car.

A friend of my wife has an immaculate Olds Alero which was subject to the ignition key recall. She did not buy the car new, and I told her the dealer would have all the info. She got the fix through the local Chevrolet dealer.


#5

@GeorgeSanJose

“Yes, GM seems to be pretty good about addressing problems when they are discovered”

With all due respect . . . ARE YOU JOKING?!

If so, it’s in extremely poor taste

It has been 100% proven that GM knew about the ignition switch problems for several years, before doing anything about it

If your statement were true, GM would have taken action 10 or so years ago

No offense intended

perhaps GM’s recent “good behavior” has made you forget their incompetence and lack of action, which led to a few people dying . . . ?


#6

The recent good behavior is mostly to minimize the penalty from NHTSA for the ignition issue, IMO.

I doubt that upper management knew about the ignition problem. From press coverage, it seems that the lower level managers responsible for the ignition took it upon themselves to “fix” the problem for the future on their own, and hope that no one would catch on to the problem.


#7
I doubt that upper management knew about the ignition problem. From press coverage, it seems that the lower level managers responsible for the ignition took it upon themselves to "fix" the problem for the future on their own, and hope that no one would catch on to the problem.

I seriously doubt that’s true…if so then GM is run even worse then I thought. That would just show they have no type of checks and balances in place or any kind of audit system. You may be right…if so it just PROVES how bad it is at GM. That’s just another nail in the coffin for them.


#8

“That’s just another nail in the coffin for them.”

What?

I have 2 or 3 GM cars subject to the key recall. None have had the recall done and probably won’t.

Like jtsanders, I’ve always kept junk off my key ring and have always taught family members “to lighten the load on the key chain,” long before this unnecessary lawsuit fiasco. Problem solved.

Heavy key loads hanging from the ignition lock/switch is not a good idea in any car. Excess wear can occur.

CSA


#9

As to the GM ignition switch issue:

First, the problem is at least partly operator error. Drivers are instructed NOT to hang excess/superfluous weight on the key in the ignition; the problem occurred when operators–either through negligence or ignorance–disregarded these instructions. Granted, this particular ignition is somewhat less tolerant of operator error that most, but the proximate cause remains operator error.

Second, loss of PS/PB will likely occur several times to a motorist in their lifetime, and being able to successfully handle this “abnormal ops” condition, without bending metal, is part of “one’s job” as a driver. I’ve dealt with PS loss (either inadvertent, or deliberate training scenarios in a parking lot, for instance)…and it’s a non-event. If one’s skill set/situational awareness is so poor that one cannot handle a fairly mundane abonormal ops, one needs to revisit the “6 P’s”: “Prior practice prevents [pee]-poor performance!”

In NTSB-speak, “The PRIMARY cause of the accident was motorist’s inability to retain directional control. A CONTRIBUTING factor was the loss of power steering.”


#10

I disagree @MikeInNH. If a small group of people want to hide something, it is possible to do so, especially in a large organization.


#11

We Are Awash In A Sea Of Government [Over] Regulations, Lawyers, Dumb People And Law Suits.

Go to McDonalds, buy a coffee, spill it in your lap and burn yourself… somebody else is to blame, right?

Sell ball shaped magnets and give warnings on the package that state Not For Children and some “parents” let their kids play with them and they eat them… somebody else at fault, again.
By the way, I believe that company is still fighting to be able to sell their magnets, again.

Drive a car without adequate training and/or supervision, speed, and crash… blame GM.

I have noticed that lots of “parents” of children injured/killed due to “accidents” that they could have prevented and they lawyer-up and go after somebody else, rather than admit and/or accept responsibility. A
The lawyers step up and a jury gets hold of it and way we go…

CSA


#12

This was for the throttle position sensor not the ignition switch and just thought it was pretty good to get a notice and an extended warranty out of the blue, anyway. I actually had the same experience years ago on my Olds for a seat belt. I dunno but seems to me the ignition switch is a dead horse but we must continue to whip it anyway.


#13
What?

I have 2 or 3 GM cars subject to the key recall. None have had the recall done and probably won’t.

I suggest you re-read my post…and try to comprehend what I was saying. I was NOT commenting on the recalls…only the possibility that they hay have no checks and balances in their engineering which every other medium to large company knows they MUST have. If upper management didn’t know about the problems…then that’s EXTREMELY POOR MANAGEMENT. Upper management should all resign.


#14

George writes

"Yes, GM seems to be pretty good about addressing problems when they are discovered
"

@db4690 writes

It has been 100% proven that GM knew about the ignition switch problems for several years, before doing anything about it.

Your are absolutely correct db4690. I was referring to present circumstances, in which they indeed do seem to be willing to address – or at least divulge – the problems they discover with their products in a time-sensitive manner.