Gas vs. diesel

#1

I have to remotor my two people golfcart.In order to keep the rearend rpm`s the same, I have to go back with a 3600rpm engine. By size, weight and ofcourse money I have narrowed it to either a 16hp single cyl. gas or a 10hp single cyl. diesel engine, both aircooled. Question: can I expect the same power output and quick response from smaller diesel engine than I can get from a gas engine? I’m stuck with the original beltdrive system, so reaching the high rpm range is critical. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks, dodgeman1

#2

Diesels usually have more torque…So from a dead stop it should be faster. But a gas engine usually revs higher so the top-end of the diesel may not be there. For a golf cart…I suspect either will do fine.

#3

Knowing nothing about diesel golf carts, my only question is - don’t diesels stink? Do you want to live with that?

#4

I would swap in a Suzuki Hayabusa engine. You’d have the fastest golf cart on the course.

#5

I have never heard of a diesel golf cart and I can’t really imagine a golf cart application really takes advantage of any of diesel’s strengths, other than maybe the ability to run it on the french fry grease from the pro-shop cafe. I’d definitely go for the gas engine.

#6

Good point - OP, have you seen this type of diesel engine in a cart? I would think a small diesel engine would be for running a generator, something like that, not something that’s constantly starting and stopping.

#7

Forget the diesel in a golf cart…All you will get is more noise, more vibration and more weight. Also, achieving 3600 rpm will push a diesel to it’s upper operating limits. Single cylinder diesels have a heavy flywheel which means very slow throttle response… They are made to power generators and pumps, not vehicles.

Having said that, I have a 10hp Yanmar air-cooled diesel engine I will sell you cheap. It was used as a marine engine in a sailboat which was wrecked in a storm. The engine was never under water, the boat went up on the rocks high and dry…

#8

I don’t golf, but are petroleum fueled golf carts allowed on the courses? I always assumed they allowed only electrics to keep noise to a minimum and prevent damage to the fairways.

#9

I have never heard of a diesel golf cart and I can’t really imagine a golf cart application really takes advantage of any of diesel’s strengths, other than maybe the ability to run it on the french fry grease from the pro-shop cafe. I’d definitely go for the gas engine.

Diesel golf carts are very popular in Mountain or very hilly Golf couses.

#10

In the “Old Folks” sub-divison I live in, people use golf carts for basic short range transportation, no golf courses within miles.

#11

Cool.

#12

Tim Allen! What are you doing here!?

#13

Most golf courses I play at have the electric carts. (Although I always walk and carry). But for very hilly courses the electrics can’t hold a charge long enough to go 18 holes. And some of the VERY HILLY have diesel for the added torque and gas mileage.

#14

You don’t want to deal with diesel fuel because it makes a mess wherever you use it. It also leaks from any fitting that isn’t perfect. If it’s gasoline driven now, then it will be a lot easier to stay with it.

#15

The more I’ve thought about this…the last time I ever saw a diesel golf cart was probably 20 years ago. I’ll bet they’ve made improvements with the gas versions that diesels aren’t needed anymore. Personally I’d stick with gas.

#16

My brother-in-law who lives in a nice community in Georgia has trails for people to use golf-carts on. You’ll find several of these communities around…NOT just in the “Old Folks” sub-divisions.

#17

If it is only being used inside a sub-division, wouldn’t an electric golf cart be good enough?