Gas leak in 2005 Caravan

dodge

#1

For about a week I started smelling gas. Checks things out and didn’t see anything until today. It is the lone on top of the tank where the plastic piece (fuel pump?) connects to the hose. Does anyone know the size? The auto store has three generic replacements but said they don’t know what size mine would be. Otherwise I have to take it off and bring it in and try to eyeball it. Not sure what the part is called, but is looks like some two piece clip. Thanks.


#2

If the fuel line connectors are leaking replace the fuel filter, the lines from the pump to the filter are included.


#3

Nevada, it’s the plastic line from the tank at the back coming off the tank to the front of the tank where it connects to a metal line. There’s no filter there that I can see. Both ends are quick connects, and it looks as if I can get just the fittings. But there are 3/8" and 5/16" as well an an option to go from one to the other. I have no clue what size it is and haven’t found anything online. Three parts stores and they all said they wouldn’t know either. If I can’t figure out the fitting right away I’m wondering if just a piece of tubing and clamps will do in its place to get the fitting off and bring it to the store.


#4

A visit to the dealership parts department might save you a lot of headache here. They have the exploded part diagrams and sometimes you would be surprised on how cheap the part is, so might not worth messing with a fuel line.

On the same note, I have twice been given free parts by the counter person because they said they learned something from me & the search.


#5

Your best bet is to remove the offending part(s) and bring them to the auto parts store so they can visually match up the correct repair parts for you. If that isn’t possible you’ll have to have your car towed to the dealership. They’ll almost certainly be able to figure it out if they have access to the car.


#6

This has turned into a giant fiasco. It’s 3/8" by the way. Took three stops at the store and extra clamps to finally get the line to stop leaking. The after market Dorman(?) suck. And finally… The plastic on top of the fuel pump is cracked as well. Looks like it’s been coming for a while, all discolored. No auto store has the cheapest, would have to be ordered. Everyone has the expensive ones, and I don’t think is worth an '05 with 135k miles. My local junkyard has one still on the vehicle, would need at least a day and deposit, no guarantees and the condition. So, since I can’t wait, I cleaned and roughed the surface and out a generous slather if JB weld on it for now. I get mixed messages on whether or not it will hold up to gas. This will likely be a temporary fix until I have the down time again to replace it.


#7

It appears 2004 was the last year for an external filter in that location on the Caravans. An OEM replacement fuel line from the pump to the chassis line is $50, the fuel pump you can buy aftermarket.

http://www.factorychryslerparts.com/showAssembly.aspx?ukey_assembly=1117022&ukey_make=1062&ukey_model=15493&modelYear=2005&ukey_category=20876&ukey_driveLine=7854&ukey_trimLevel=18699


#8

Car stranded me on the highway last night, engine just quit. Got power, turns over without any odd sounds, but won’t start. Replaced the fuel pump relay today, as I was told if you can hear the pump start but can’t get it running it might be that. Didn’t work, so suspect the fuel pump itself. Any way to verify? I thought if I disconnected the line and ran it into a jar, it should fill if I turn the key. Would that tell me? Thanks for all the unit so far, at least the line doesn’t leak anymore


#9

The fuel pump on these cars goes out very often. The part itself should be around $100 online and I believe it comes with the filter-check on this. At any rate, it might be “cheaper” to just change the pump and see what happens. Because if you don’t need a new pump now, you will need one pretty soon.


#10

Yeah, well I do need one anyway as this one leaks. JB Weld helped slow it down but not a perfect fix. Would be nice to verify its the pump while I wait for it to arrive.


#11

A leak will cause low fuel pressure and it won’t run. It’s also dangerous.


#12

I took the fuel line off and ran it to a gas can. When I let the ignition the relay engages and some gas comes out. When I turn to start no gas comes out the line. So bad fuel pump, right? Got one on order, just waiting for it to arrive.


#13

Should have read “when I key the ignition”. Wasn’t sure if there was some design that would not engage the fuel pump of the line was off, but figure if it primes it should also pump when I try to start.


#14

So I disconnected the fuel line and ran it to a can. When I key the ignition the relay engages and fuel comes out. But when I turn to start there’s no fuel. So that the pump gone bad, right? I did t know if there was anything in the design that wouldn’t allow the pump to run if the line was disconnected.


#15

The pump will run for a few seconds then shut off if the PCM detects that the engine isn’t running.


#16

The pump will run for a few seconds then shut off if the PCM detects that the engine isn’t running.

+1
This is a critical safety requirement. If you get into an accident that ruptures the fuel line, you don’t want the fuel pump continuously pumping gas all over the ground.


#17

NYBo andf JoeMario, but I should still get some gas when I try to start, right? Even if for a few seconds. I get some when I turn to on, but nothing when I try to start.

We’ll find out soon enough. I dropped and emptied the tank, and a new pump is on order. I do hope that’s the problem, don’t want to spend the money on it if it aint broke.


#18

AIReset:
I don’t know how the engineers programmed the ECU for your particular car.

When you first turn the key to “on”, it’s easy for the ECU to detect no buildup in pressure (because you’re dumping it into a gas tank), and as a result, turn the pump off.

That same logic is easy to program for a key turned to the “start” position. E.G., if fuel pressure won’t build up, then stop the pump.


#19

I hope the pump does the trick, but I have some doubt. One must be careful not to start throwing parts at problem until the right one is found to solve what could be a single problem. It could get expensive.
CSA


#20

I agree, and also talking with a coworker who I found out knows a thing or two about cars it sounds like it might not be a bad fuel pump. He had me take a spark plug out and look for a spark when I turn the ignition. No spark, so now I might have to troubleshoot all the ignition (something else I’ll have to research). In any case, the pump leaks, so it has to get replaced.